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List of massacres in Mexico

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Massacres

Name Date Location Deaths Notes
Goliad massacre March 27, 1836 Goliad County, Texas 342 465 prisoners. 28 escaped, 20 spared as workers, 75 spared as unarmed captives.
Dawson massacre September 17, 1842 near San Antonio de Bexar, Texas 36 15 captured and 36 killed out of a total of 54 Texan men.
Saint Patrick's Battalion massacre 10–13 September 1847 Chapultepec, Mexico City 50 50 surrendered Irish volunteers who fought as part of the Mexican Army against the United States in the Mexican–American War, collectively known as Saint Patrick's battalion were killed by the U.S. Army.
1846 Monterrey massacre September 23, 1846 Monterrey, Nuevo León ~60 Ampudia ordered the white flag of surrender to be flown. Many American troops, especially the Texas Rangers ran about looting and burning houses, raping women, and killing entire families of Monterrey.[1]
1847 Monterrey massacre January 4, 1847 Monterrey, Nuevo León ~50 Texas volunteers blamed the Mexicans for the death of several of their companions in the occupied Monterrey. Consequently, American troops began shooting all civilians they encountered. The Houston Telegraph and Register, citing military sources reported over 50 killed.[2]
Crabb massacre April 1–8, 1857 Caborca, Sonora 84 84 killed out of a total of 85 American men.
Mazocoba massacre January 18, 1900 Guaymas, Sonora ~400 Also known as the Battle of Mazocoba
Río Blanco strike January 7 and 8, 1907 Río Blanco, Veracruz 50 to 70 Federal troops put down rioting textile workers
Torreón massacre May 15, 1911 Torreón, Coahuila 300
Santa Isabel massacre January 10, 1916 near Santa Isabel, Chihuahua 18 Villistas stopped a train near Santa Isabel, Chihuahua and killed eighteen American passengers from the ASARCO company of Tucson, Arizona.
León massacre January 2, 1946 León, Guanajuato 30-100 [3][4]
Tlatelolco massacre October 2, 1968 Mexico City 40-400
Corpus Christi massacre June 10, 1971 Mexico City 120 Also known as "El Halconazo"
Tula massacre January 14, 1982 Atotonilco de Tula, Hidalgo 13
Aguas Blancas massacre 28 June 1995 Aguas Blancas, Guerrero 17
Acteal massacre December 22, 1997 Chenalhó, Chiapas 45
El Sauzal massacre September 17, 1998 El Sauzal, Baja California 19 [5]
Villas de Salvárcar massacre January 31, 2010 Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua 15
Guerrero mass graves June 2010 Taxco, Guerrero 55
Nuevo León mass graves June 25, 2010 Nuevo León ~70
2010 San Fernando massacre August 24, 2010 San Fernando, Tamaulipas 72
San Fernando massacre April 6, 2011 San Fernando, Tamaulipas 193
Coahuila mass graves June 3, 2011 Piedras Negras, Coahuila 38
Durango massacres April 2011 Durango, Durango 340
Monterrey casino attack August 25, 2011 Monterrey, Nuevo León 52
Altamira prison brawl January 4, 2012 Altamira, Tamaulipas 31
Apodaca prison riot February 19, 2012 Apodaca, Nuevo León 44
Cadereyta Jiménez massacre 13 May 2012 Cadereyta Jiménez, Nuevo León 49
Tlatlaya massacre June 30, 2014 San Pedro Limón, Tlatlaya, Michoacán 22 22 civilians executed by government troops.[6][7]
Iguala massacre 26 September - 5 October 2014 Iguala, Guerrero ~40
Apatzingán massacre January 5, 2015 Apatzingán, Michoacán 16 16 unarmed civilians killed by federal police outside Apatzingán city hall.[8]
Tanhuato–Ecuandureo shootout May 22, 2015 Tanhuato, Michoacán 22+ to 42 [9][10]
Salamanca nightclub shooting 9 March 2019 Salamanca, Guanajuato 15
Minatitlán shooting 19 April 2019 Minatitlán, Veracruz 14 [11]
Uruapan massacre 8 August 2019 Uruapan, Michoacán 19
Coatzacoalcos nightclub fire 27 August 2019 Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz 30 [12][13]
LeBarón and Langford families massacre 4 November 2019 Near Bavispe, Sonora 9 Gunmen suspected of being drug cartel members ambushed three vehicles occupied by Mormon U.S.-Mexican dual citizens on a highway in Sonora, killing nine, including six children. The cars and the burned bodies of the victims were found by the police.[14]
Cieneguillas prison riots 31 December 2019
2 January 2020
Near Cieneguillas, Zacatecas 17 Using weapons smuggled into the prison, the inmates rioted with 16 being killed in the first riot on 31 December and an additional inmate being killed in the second riot on 2 January.[15]

See also

References

  1. ^ Ryan Curtis. Mexico Under Fire: Being the Diary of Samuel Ryan Curtis, 3rd Ohio Volunteer Regiment, During the American Military Occupation of Northern Mexico, 1846-1847. TCU Press. p. 30. ISBN 9780875651279. Retrieved January 17, 2017.
  2. ^ Miguel González Quiroga, César Morado Macías (2006). Nuevo León ocupado: aspectos de la guerra México-Estados Unidos. Nuevo León, México: Fondo Editorial de NL. ISBN 9709715194. Retrieved January 17, 2017.
  3. ^ "68 años de la matanza". Archived from the original on 2014-01-05. Retrieved 2015-06-04.
  4. ^ "La masacre contra León, 22 años antes de Tlatelolco".
  5. ^ "'El Sauzal': A un año de la masacre".
  6. ^ "New Evidence Leads to Jailing of Mexican Soldiers After Apparent Massacre - VICE News". Vice.com. Retrieved 18 January 2018.
  7. ^ "Mexico Tlatlaya Massacre: Mass Executions Were Illegal And Excessive, Rules Report From Mexican Lawmakers". IBTimes.com. 17 April 2015. Retrieved 18 January 2018.
  8. ^ "'It Was the Feds': How Mexico's Federal Police Slaughtered At Least 16 Civilians in Michoacan - VICE News". Vice.com. Retrieved 18 January 2018.
  9. ^ "Police massacre on ranch leaves deep scars in Mexican town". 20 August 2016. Retrieved 18 January 2018 – via Reuters.
  10. ^ SIPSE, Grupo (2016-08-19). "¿Qué ocurrió realmente en la matanza de Tanhuato?". SIPSE.com (in Spanish). Retrieved 2017-08-27.
  11. ^ Reina, Elena; Salinas, Carlos (2019-04-21). "Un grupo armado irrumpe en una fiesta en Veracruz y asesina a 14 personas". El País (in Spanish). ISSN 1134-6582. Retrieved 2019-09-27.
  12. ^ Old reference that claims only 23 killed. [1]
  13. ^ Camhaji, Elías (2019-08-31). "Los cabos sueltos tras la masacre en Coatzacoalcos". El País (in Spanish). ISSN 1134-6582. Retrieved 2019-09-27.
  14. ^ "At least nine Americans killed in Mexican highway ambush". NBC News. Retrieved 2019-11-05.
  15. ^ "Cieneguillas, a Mexican prison subdued by crime". El Universal (in Spanish). 2020-01-03. Retrieved 2020-01-06.
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