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List of Hot Country Singles number ones of 1974

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An older man wearing a white cowboy hat and a denim shirt, with a guitar hanging over his shoulder standing at a microphone raising his right fist in the air
Bobby Bare had his only number one single in 1974.

Hot Country Songs is a chart that ranks the top-performing country music songs in the United States, published by Billboard magazine. In 1974, 41 different singles topped the chart, which at the time was published under the title Hot Country Singles, in 52 issues of the magazine, based on playlists submitted by country music radio stations and sales reports submitted by stores.[1]

At the start of the year, the number one song on the chart was "If We Make It Through December" by Merle Haggard, the song's third week in the top spot.[2] Charlie Rich had the most number ones of 1974, taking five different songs to the top spot, followed by Dolly Parton, who had three solo chart-toppers and one in collaboration with her long-time mentor Porter Wagoner. Wagoner and Parton had charted with a number of duets since 1967,[3] but "Please Don't Stop Loving Me" was their only number one as a duo.[4] In 1973, Parton had taken the decision to end her working relationship with Wagoner, which served as the inspiration for the song "I Will Always Love You",[5] one of her three solo number ones of 1974. In 1982 she re-recorded the song and it once again went to number one, making her the first artist to top the country chart with two different recordings of the same song.[6] Wagoner and Parton's chart-topper was one of two male-female duets to reach number one in 1974, the other being Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn's "As Soon as I Hang Up the Phone". Twitty and Lynn had a run of success with duet recordings in the early 1970s alongside their ongoing solo careers.[7]

In addition to having the most individual chart-toppers, Charlie Rich also spent the highest total number of weeks at number one during the year. The singer nicknamed the "Silver Fox"[8] spent eight weeks in the top spot with "There Won't Be Anymore", "A Very Special Love Song", "I Don't See Me in Your Eyes Anymore", "I Love My Friend" and "She Called Me Baby", all of which also crossed over to Billboard's all-genre singles chart, the Hot 100;[9] no other artist spent more than four weeks atop the country listing. A fifteen-year veteran of the music industry, Rich had finally achieved stardom in both the country and pop markets in the early 1970s and was at the peak of his success in 1974, but changing musical tastes and increasing personal problems led to him largely retiring at the end of the decade.[10] In June, Ronnie Milsap had his first number one with "Pure Love".[11] He would go on to become one of the most successful country performers of the 1970s and 1980s, topping the Hot Country Singles chart more than 30 times.[11] In the same month, Waylon Jennings reached number one for the first time with "This Time".[12] Jennings would go on to become one of the mainstays of the successful outlaw country movement of the late 1970s and, like Milsap, is a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame.[13][14][15] A third future Hall of Fame inductee to top the chart for the first time in 1974 was Bobby Bare,[16] who achieved the only number one of his lengthy career in July with "Marie Laveau".[17] Mickey Gilley, Billy Swan, Melba Montgomery and Billy "Crash" Craddock were also first-time chart-toppers in 1974.[18][19][20][21] The final number one of the year was "What a Man My Man Is" by Lynn Anderson.

Chart history

A grey-haired man
Charlie Rich had five number ones in 1974.
A dark-haired man wearing dark glasses, smiling broadly
Ronnie Milsap had the first of more than 30 country number ones.
A dark-haired man wearing a shirt and a dark jacket, smiling broadly
Billy "Crash" Craddock had one of the few chart-toppers to spend more than a single week at number one.
A blonde woman wearing dark clothing, holding a trophy in the shape of hands applauding
Dolly Parton had four number ones, including one of her best-known songs, "I Will Always Love You".
Issue date Title Artist(s) Ref.
January 5 "If We Make It Through December" Merle Haggard [2]
January 12 [22]
January 19 "I Love" Tom T. Hall [23]
January 26 [24]
February 2 "Jolene" Dolly Parton [25]
February 9 "World of Make Believe" Bill Anderson [26]
February 16 "That's the Way Love Goes" Johnny Rodriguez [27]
February 23 "Another Lonely Song" Tammy Wynette [28]
March 2 [29]
March 9 "There Won't Be Anymore" Charlie Rich [30]
March 16 [31]
March 23 "There's a Honky Tonk Angel (Who'll Take Me Back In)" Conway Twitty [32]
March 30 "Would You Lay with Me (In a Field of Stone)" Tanya Tucker [33]
April 6 "A Very Special Love Song" Charlie Rich [34]
April 13 [35]
April 20 [36]
April 27 "Hello Love" Hank Snow [37]
May 4 "Things Aren't Funny Anymore" Merle Haggard [38]
May 11 "Is It Wrong (For Loving You)" Sonny James [39]
May 18 "Country Bumpkin" Cal Smith [40]
May 25 "No Charge" Melba Montgomery [41]
June 1 "Pure Love" Ronnie Milsap [42]
June 8 "I Will Always Love You" Dolly Parton [43]
June 15 "I Don't See Me in Your Eyes Anymore" Charlie Rich [44]
June 22 "This Time" Waylon Jennings [45]
June 29 "Room Full of Roses" Mickey Gilley [46]
July 6 "He Thinks I Still Care" Anne Murray [47]
July 13 [48]
July 20 "Marie Laveau" Bobby Bare [49]
July 27 "You Can't Be a Beacon If Your Light Don't Shine" Donna Fargo [50]
August 3 "Rub It In" Billy "Crash" Craddock [51]
August 10 [52]
August 17 "As Soon as I Hang Up the Phone" Conway Twitty and Loretta Lynn [53]
August 24 "Old Man from the Mountain" Merle Haggard [54]
August 31 "The Grand Tour" George Jones [55]
September 7 "Please Don't Tell Me How the Story Ends" Ronnie Milsap [56]
September 14 [57]
September 21 "I Wouldn't Want to Live If You Didn't Love Me" Don Williams [58]
September 28 "I'm a Ramblin' Man" Waylon Jennings [59]
October 5 "I Love My Friend" Charlie Rich [60]
October 12 "Please Don't Stop Loving Me" Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton [61]
October 19 "I See the Want To in Your Eyes" Conway Twitty [62]
October 26 [63]
November 2 "I Overlooked an Orchid" Mickey Gilley [64]
November 9 "Love Is Like a Butterfly" Dolly Parton [65]
November 16 "Country Is" Tom T. Hall [66]
November 23 "Trouble in Paradise" Loretta Lynn [67]
November 30 "Back Home Again" John Denver [68]
December 7 "She Called Me Baby" Charlie Rich [69]
December 14 "I Can Help" Billy Swan [70]
December 21 [71]
December 28 "What a Man My Man Is" Lynn Anderson [72]

See also

References

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2005). Joel Whitburn's Top Country Songs: 1944-2005. Record Research. p. ix. ISBN 978-0-89820-165-9.
  2. ^ a b "Hot Country Songs chart for January 5, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 19, 2018.
  3. ^ Vinopal, David. "Dolly Parton Biography & History". AllMusic. Archived from the original on April 17, 2018. Retrieved April 22, 2018.
  4. ^ "Porter Wagoner Chart History". Billboard. Archived from the original on May 19, 2018. Retrieved April 22, 2018.
  5. ^ Paulson, David (December 26, 2015). "Dolly Parton remembers writing 'I Will Always Love You'". The Tennessean. Retrieved April 22, 2018.
  6. ^ Ellison, Curtis W. (1995). Country Music Culture: From Hard Times to Heaven. Univ. Press of Mississippi. p. 195. ISBN 978-1-60473-934-3.
  7. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Conway Twitty Biography & History". AllMusic. Archived from the original on December 23, 2019. Retrieved December 23, 2019.
  8. ^ Holden, Stephen (July 26, 1995). "Charlie Rich, 62, 'Silver Fox,' Country Singer and Songwriter". New York Times. Archived from the original on January 28, 2020. Retrieved January 28, 2020.
  9. ^ "Charlie Rich Chart History". Billboard. Archived from the original on May 24, 2018. Retrieved April 22, 2018.
  10. ^ Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Charlie Rich Biography & History". AllMusic. Archived from the original on January 28, 2020. Retrieved January 28, 2020.
  11. ^ a b Zaleski, Annie (February 6, 2019). "Top 10 Ronnie Milsap Songs". The Boot. Townsquare Media. Archived from the original on February 6, 2019. Retrieved April 22, 2018.
  12. ^ The Comprehensive Country Music Encyclopedia. Times Books. 1994. p. 184. ISBN 978-0-8129-2247-9.
  13. ^ Gage, Jeff (January 12, 2018). "Country Music Hall of Fame Announces Massive Outlaw Country Exhibit". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on March 19, 2018. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  14. ^ Dansby, Andrew (February 14, 2002). "Waylon Jennings Dead at Sixty-four". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on March 11, 2018. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  15. ^ Betts, Stephen L. (January 12, 2015). "Ronnie Milsap to Be Focus of Country Hall of Fame Exhibit". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on April 23, 2018. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  16. ^ Morris, Edward (October 28, 2013). "Kenny Rogers, Bobby Bare, Jack Clement Inducted Into Country Music Hall of Fame". CMT. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  17. ^ Betts, Stephen L.; Leahey, Andrew; Newman, Melinda; Hudak, Joseph; Manning, Erin; Dunkerley, Beville; Gold, Adam; Moss, Marissa R. (February 13, 2015). "Booting Ass and Taking Names: Country's 20 Best Revenge Songs". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on April 23, 2018. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  18. ^ Jurek, Thom. "Room Full of Roses/Gilley's Smokin'". AllMusic. Archived from the original on April 23, 2018. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  19. ^ "Billy Swan Chart History". Billboard. Archived from the original on May 24, 2018. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  20. ^ Ankeny, Jason. "Melba Montgomery Biography & History". AllMusic. Archived from the original on April 23, 2018. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  21. ^ Huey, Steve. "Billy "Crash" Craddock Biography & History". AllMusic. Archived from the original on April 23, 2018. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  22. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for January 12, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 19, 2018.
  23. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for January 19, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 19, 2018.
  24. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for January 26, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 19, 2018.
  25. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for February 2, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 19, 2018.
  26. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for February 9, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  27. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for February 16, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  28. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for February 23, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  29. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for March 2, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  30. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for March 9, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  31. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for March 16, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  32. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for March 23, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  33. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for March 30, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  34. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for April 6, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  35. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for April 13, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  36. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for April 20, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  37. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for April 27, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  38. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for May 4, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  39. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for May 11, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  40. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for May 18, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  41. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for May 25, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  42. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for June 1, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  43. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for June 8, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  44. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for June 15, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  45. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for June 22, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  46. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for June 29, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  47. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for July 6, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 31, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  48. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for July 13, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  49. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for July 20, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  50. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for July 27, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  51. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for August 3, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  52. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for August 10, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  53. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for August 17, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  54. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for August 24, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  55. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for August 31, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  56. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for September 7, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  57. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for September 14, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  58. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for September 21, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 31, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  59. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for September 28, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  60. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for October 5, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  61. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for October 12, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  62. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for October 19, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  63. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for October 26, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  64. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for November 2, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  65. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for November 9, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 31, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  66. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for November 16, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  67. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for November 23, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  68. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for November 30, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  69. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for December 7, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  70. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for December 14, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  71. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for December 21, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  72. ^ "Hot Country Songs chart for December 28, 1974". Billboard. Archived from the original on March 29, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.

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