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2020 coronavirus pandemic in South Carolina

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2020 coronavirus pandemic in South Carolina
COVID-19 Warning Mount Pleasant South Carolina.jpg
Warning sign in Mount Pleasant
COVID-19 Cases by counties of South Carolina.png
  Confirmed cases
  COVID-19 related deaths
Last updated on April 3, 2020 at 5:00 p.m. EDT
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationSouth Carolina, U.S.
Index caseMarch 7, 2020
Charleston and Kershaw counties
Confirmed cases1,700
Deaths
34
Official website
www.scdhec.gov/covid19

The 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of South Carolina in March 2020. As of April 3, 2020, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control has confirmed 1,700 cases in the state, resulting in 34 deaths.[1] On April 2, 2020, DHEC announced that the virus had spread to all 46 counties in the state.[2]

Timeline

COVID-19 cases in South Carolina, United States  ()
     Deaths        Confirmed cases
Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-03-07
2(n/a)
2020-03-08
6(+200%)
2020-03-09
7(+17%)
2020-03-10
9(+29%)
2020-03-11
10(+11%)
2020-03-12
12(+20%)
2020-03-13
13(+8%)
2020-03-14
19(+46%)
2020-03-15
28(+47%)
2020-03-16
33(+18%) 1(n/a)
2020-03-17
47(+42%) (=)
2020-03-18
60(+28%) (=)
2020-03-19
80(+33%) (=)
2020-03-20
125(+56%) 3(+200%)
2020-03-21
173(+38%) (=)
2020-03-22
195(+13%) (=)
2020-03-23
298(+53%) 5(+67%)
2020-03-24
342(+15%) 7(+40%)
2020-03-25
424(+24%) 8(+14%)
2020-03-26
456(+8%) 9(+13%)
2020-03-27
539(+18%) 13(+44%)
2020-03-28
660(+22%) 15(+15%)
2020-03-29
774(+17%) 16(+7%)
2020-03-30
925(+20%) 18(+13%)
2020-03-31
1083(+17%) 22(+22%)
2020-04-01
1293(+19%) 26(+18%)
2020-04-02
1554(+20%) 31(+19%)
2020-04-03
1700(+9%) 34(+10%)
Source: scdhec.gov
  • March 6: DHEC announces that two women, one from Charleston County and one from Kershaw County, are under investigation and are presumed to have South Carolina's first cases of COVID-19.[3]
  • March 7: Tests for the two women return as "presumptive-positive," giving South Carolina its first two cases.[4]
  • March 12:
  • March 13: Governor Henry McMaster declares a state of emergency and orders the closure of all public schools in Kershaw and Lancaster counties for 14 days.[7]
  • March 15: Governor McMaster and other officials announce the closure of all public schools in the state until March 31.[8]
  • March 16:
  • March 17: Governor McMaster issues an executive order requiring the mandatory shutdown of dine-in service in restaurants and bars. The order also includes the delay of state tax deadlines until June 1, the general request of state agencies to waive any restrictive regulations in order to move faster to address the virus, and also prohibits gatherings of more than 50 people at publicly-owned facilities.[12][13]
  • March 19: The Governor issues an additional executive order, ordering non-essential state employees to stay home, emergency measures for unemployment claims and benefits, among other orders, including calling for all public colleges and universities in the state to finish their semesters online.[14][15][16]
  • March 20: Two deaths are reported, one in Florence County and one in Charleston County, bringing the total for the state to three. Both persons were reported as being elderly and having underlying health conditions.[17]
  • March 21: The Governor says that a shelter in place is "not under consideration" at the time, after rumors to the contrary and similar action being taken by other states.[18] McMaster also orders local law enforcement to disperse crowds gathered on state beaches.[19]
  • March 23:
    • DHEC reports two additional deaths, one from Kershaw County (later reclassified to Sumter County) and one from Clarendon County, bringing South Carolina's total to five. Both persons had underlying health conditions.[20]
    • Governor McMaster holds a briefing in which he instructs law enforcement to disperse any public gathering of three or more people, with violations of this rule resulting in a misdemeanor.[21]
  • March 24:
    • Governor McMaster and State Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman announce that public schools statewide, including colleges and universities, will remain closed through the end of April.[22][23]
    • The sixth and seventh coronavirus-related deaths are reported by DHEC. One of these was the second death reported from Florence County; this person was reported to have underlying health problems. The other death was reported from Horry County; this person did not have any reported underlying health problems. Additionally, DHEC reported that an individual whose death was originally attributed to Kershaw County actually resided in Sumter County.[24]
  • March 25: The death of Jack West, the son of former Governor John C. West, is reported as the eighth in South Carolina and the first from Kershaw County.[25]
  • March 27:
    • It is announced that state parks will be closed through the end of April.[26]
    • President Donald Trump approves South Carolina's disaster declaration.[27]
  • April 1: The Governor orders all non-essential businesses closed temporarily.[28]

Statistics

  1–5 confirmed
  6–10 confirmed
  11–20 confirmed
  21–40 confirmed
  41–60 confirmed
  61–80 confirmed
  81+ confirmed

Cases by county

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases in South Carolina

Updated April 3, 2020

County Confirmed Cases Deceased Notes
Abbeville 6 0
Aiken 22 1
Allendale 1 0
Anderson 62 3
Bamberg 5 0
Barnwell 2 0
Beaufort 131 2
Berkeley 42 0
Calhoun 3 1
Charleston 247 1 One case that was originally attributed to Charleston County was from a person that resided in another state.[29]
Cherokee 1 0
Chester 7 0
Chesterfield 10 0
Clarendon 34 1
Colleton 6 0
Darlington 15 0
Dillon 1 0
Dorchester 36 0
Edgefield 5 0
Fairfield 8 0
Florence 29 5
Georgetown 16 0
Greenville 174 2
Greenwood 9 0
Hampton 1 0
Horry 51 4
Jasper 8 0
Kershaw 136 2 A death originally attributed to Kershaw County was later reclassified to Sumter County.[24]
Lancaster 31 0
Laurens 6 0
Lee 13 1
Lexington 78 1 County with the first reported death.[9]
Marion 2 1
Marlboro 3 0
McCormick 1 0
Newberry 5 0
Oconee 5 0
Orangeburg 25 0
Pickens 17 0
Richland 224 5
Saluda 2 0
Spartanburg 60 0
Sumter 75 3
Union 6 0
Williamsburg 6 0
York 73 1
Total 1,700 34

Testing

The monitoring and testing of COVID-19 in South Carolina per the Department of Health and Environmental Control is as follows:[1]

Type Number
Negative tests 5,777
Positive tests 1,700

Impact on sports

In college sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association cancelled all winter and spring tournaments, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[58] This affected South Carolina especially, as the Bon Secours Wellness Arena in Greenville was set to host first and second-round games in the women's tournament.[59] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association also canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[60]

References

  1. ^ a b c "Monitoring & Testing (COVID-19) | SCDHEC". scdhec.gov. Retrieved 3 April 2020.
  2. ^ "COVID-19 reported in all 46 counties across SC, 4 cases in Laurens County". GoLaurens.Com. 2 April 2020. Retrieved 3 April 2020.
  3. ^ Feit, Noah; Daprile, Lucas; Fretwell, Sammy (6 March 2020). "First potential coronavirus cases under investigation in South Carolina". thestate.com. The State. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  4. ^ Riviera, Ray; Phillips, Patrick (7 March 2020). "First possible S.C. novel coronavirus cases detected in Charleston, Kershaw Counties". live5news.com. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  5. ^ Glover, Emery (12 March 2020). "SCISA postpones spring sports in S.C. amid coronavirus concerns". wistv.com. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  6. ^ "SC SCIENCE OLYMPIAD". sc-so.org. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  7. ^ Mallory, Laurel (13 March 2020). "S.C. governor declares state of emergency; orders Kershaw, Lancaster county schools to close". wistv.com. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  8. ^ Ablon, Matthew (15 March 2020). "SC governor shuts down all public schools until March 31 to combat spread of coronavirus". FOX Carolina. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  9. ^ a b "State of South Carolina Reports First COVID-19 Related Death". South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control.
  10. ^ Mallory, Laurel. "S.C. reports first COVID-19-related death was Lexington Co. nursing home patient". wistv.com. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  11. ^ "SCHSL suspends all spring sports due to threat of coronavirus". wmbfnews.com. 16 March 2020. Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  12. ^ "Executive Order No. 2020-10" (PDF). South Carolina Office of the Governor. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  13. ^ "Governor's Update on Coronavirus (COVID-19)". YouTube. March 17, 2020. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  14. ^ "Executive Order No. 2020-11" (PDF). South Carolina Office of the Governor. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  15. ^ "Governor's Update on Coronavirus (COVID-19) March 19, 2020". YouTube. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  16. ^ Mallory, Laurel (19 March 2020). "S.C. governor asks colleges to complete semester online as 21 more COVID-19 cases reported". wistv.com. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  17. ^ a b Mallory, Laurel (20 March 2020). "DHEC: 2 more people in South Carolina die after contracting coronavirus". wistv.com. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  18. ^ "S.C. governor: shelter-in-place "not under consideration"". wbtv.com. 21 March 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  19. ^ Staff, WBTV Web. "46 additional coronavirus cases in South Carolina, statewide total rises to 173". www.wbtv.com. Retrieved 2020-03-22.
  20. ^ a b "State of South Carolina Reports Two Additional COVID-19 Related Deaths | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 23 March 2020. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  21. ^ "Coronavirus updates in SC: Gov. McMaster directs law enforcement to break up public gatherings of 3 or more". The Greenville News. 23 March 2020. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  22. ^ "SC schools to remain closed through April". GoLaurens.Com. 24 March 2020. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  23. ^ "South Carolina schools will remain closed until the end of April, governor says". WYFF. 24 March 2020. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  24. ^ a b c "South Carolina Announces Two Additional Deaths Related to COVID-19 | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 24 March 2020. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  25. ^ a b Fretwell, Sammy (25 March 2020). "Coronavirus claims life of lobbyist, son of former South Carolina governor". thestate.com. The State. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  26. ^ "All SC state parks to close due to COVID-19, park officials say". WYFF. 27 March 2020. Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  27. ^ "Pres. Trump approves South Carolina disaster declaration". WBTW. 27 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  28. ^ Kalsi, Dal (1 April 2020). "Governor orders 'non-essential' SC businesses in 3 categories to close by 5 p.m. Wednesday". FOX Carolina. Retrieved 3 April 2020.
  29. ^ a b "45 new cases of COVID-19 in South Carolina, DHEC says". WYFF. 20 March 2020. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  30. ^ "Monitoring & Testing (COVID-19)". South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. March 7, 2020. Archived from the original on March 7, 2020. Retrieved March 7, 2020.
  31. ^ Dillane, Matt (8 March 2020). "DHEC: 6 presumed positive cases of coronavirus in SC". WCIV. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  32. ^ Daprile, Lucas; Ellis, Sarah (9 March 2020). "Total number of coronavirus cases in South Carolina rises to 7". thestate.com. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  33. ^ "Coronavirus Cases up to 9 in SC After 2 More Positive Tests". usnews.com. 10 March 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  34. ^ Moss, Teresa (11 March 2020). "South Carolina coronavirus cases rise to 10; Beaufort County protection efforts increase". islandpacket.com. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  35. ^ "DHEC Announces Additional Possible Cases of 2019 Novel Coronavirus in South Carolina | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 12 March 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  36. ^ "DHEC Announces Additional Case of 2019 Novel Coronavirus in South Carolina | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 13 March 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  37. ^ "DHEC Announces Additional Six Cases of 2019 Novel Coronavirus in South Carolina | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 14 March 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  38. ^ "DHEC Announces Additional Nine Cases of 2019 Novel Coronavirus in South Carolina | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 15 March 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  39. ^ "DHEC Announces Additional Five Cases of 2019 Novel Coronavirus in South Carolina | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  40. ^ "DHEC Announces Additional 14 Cases of 2019 Novel Coronavirus in South Carolina". South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  41. ^ "DHEC Announces 13 Additional Cases of 2019 Novel Coronavirus in South Carolina | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 18 March 2020. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  42. ^ "DHEC Announces 21 Additional Cases of 2019 Novel Coronavirus in South Carolina | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 19 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  43. ^ "DHEC Announces 45 Additional Cases of 2019 Novel Coronavirus in South Carolina | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 20 March 2020. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  44. ^ "South Carolina Announces Additional 46 Cases of COVID-19, Urges Residents take Prevention Precautions | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 21 March 2020. Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  45. ^ "South Carolina Announces Additional 22 Cases of COVID-19, Continues to Urge Residents to take Prevention Precautions | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 22 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  46. ^ "South Carolina Announces Additional 103 Cases of COVID-19, Encourages Residents to Protect Physical and Mental Health | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 23 March 2020. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  47. ^ "South Carolina Announces Additional 44 Cases of COVID-19 | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 24 March 2020. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  48. ^ "South Carolina Announces Additional 82 Cases of COVID-19 | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 25 March 2020. Retrieved 25 March 2020.
  49. ^ "South Carolina Announces Two Deaths Related to COVID-19, 32 Additional Cases | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 26 March 2020. Retrieved 26 March 2020.
  50. ^ "South Carolina Announces Four Deaths Related to COVID-19, 86 Additional Cases | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 27 March 2020. Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  51. ^ "South Carolina Announces Two Additional Deaths Related to COVID-19, 121 New Cases | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 28 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  52. ^ "South Carolina Announces One Additional Death Related to COVID- 19, 113 New Cases | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 29 March 2020. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  53. ^ "South Carolina Announces Two Additional Deaths Related to COVID-19, 151 New Cases | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 30 March 2020. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  54. ^ "South Carolina Announces Four Additional Deaths Related to COVID-19, 158 New Cases | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 31 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  55. ^ "South Carolina Announces Four Additional Deaths Related to COVID-19, 210 New Cases | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 1 Apr 2020. Retrieved 1 Apr 2020.
  56. ^ "COVID-19 Reported in All 46 Counties Across South Carolina, 5 deaths, 261 New Cases | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 2 April 2020. Retrieved 3 April 2020.
  57. ^ "South Carolina Announces Three Additional Deaths Related to COVID-19, 147 New Cases | SCDHEC". www.scdhec.gov. 3 April 2020. Retrieved 3 April 2020.
  58. ^ NCAA cancels remaining winter and spring championships NCAA, March 12, 2020
  59. ^ Fair, Jim (18 April 2017). "Greenville selected to host NCAA men and women basketball tournaments". GreerToday.com. Retrieved 23 March 2020.
  60. ^ NJCAA cancels spring sports, basketball nationals amid coronavirus outbreak MLive.com, March 16, 2020

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