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2020 coronavirus pandemic in Pennsylvania

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2020 coronavirus pandemic in Pennsylvania
COVID-19 outbreak Pennsylvania per capita cases map.svg
Confirmed cases per 10,000 inhabitants by county
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationPennsylvania, U.S.
First outbreakWuhan, Hubei, China
Index caseDelaware and Wayne counties
Arrival dateMarch 6, 2020
(4 weeks and 1 day)
Confirmed cases8,420
Deaths
102
Official website
www.health.pa.gov/topics/disease/Pages/Coronavirus.aspx

The 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic was confirmed to have reached the U.S. state of Pennsylvania in March 2020. As of April 2, 2020, the Pennsylvania Department of Health has confirmed 8,420 cases and 102 deaths in the state.[1]

Timeline

COVID-19 cases in Pennsylvania, United States  ()
     Deaths        Active cases
Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-03-06
2(n.a.)
2020-03-07
4(+100%)
2020-03-08
6(+50%)
2020-03-09
10(+67%)
2020-03-10
12(+20%)
2020-03-11
16(+33%)
2020-03-12
22(+38%)
2020-03-13
41(+86%)
2020-03-14
47(+15%)
2020-03-15
63(+34%)
2020-03-16
76(+21%)
2020-03-17
96(+26%)
2020-03-18
133(+38%) 1(n.a.)
2020-03-19
185(+39%) 1(+0%)
2020-03-20
268(+45%) 1(+0%)
2020-03-21
371(+38%) 2(+100%)
2020-03-22
479(+29%) 3(+50%)
2020-03-23
644(+34%) 6(+100%)
2020-03-24
851(+32%) 7(+17%)
2020-03-25
1,127(+32%) 11(+57%)
2020-03-26
1,687(+50%) 16(+45%)
2020-03-27
2,218(+31%) 22(+38%)
2020-03-28
2,751(+24%) 34(+55%)
2020-03-29
3,394(+23%) 38(+12%)
2020-03-30
4,087(+20%) 48(+26%)
2020-03-31
4,843(+18%) 63(+31%)
2020-04-01
5,805(+20%) 74(+17%)
2020-04-02
7,016(+21%) 90(+22%)
2020-04-03
8,420(+20%) 102(+13%)
Cases: The number of cases confirmed in Pennsylvania.
Sources: [2]
  • On March 6, Governor Tom Wolf reported Pennsylvania's first two confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Delaware County and in Wayne County.[3][4] Both cases were related to travel.[5][6][7]
  • On March 9, 4 new cases were confirmed, bringing the total to 10.
  • On March 10, 2 new cases were confirmed, bringing the total to 12.[8]
  • On March 13, Governor Wolf announced that all Pennsylvania schools will be closed for at least two weeks.[9] Additionally, park programs were canceled.[10]
  • By March 17, there were 96 cases in the state; more than half of them were in the Philadelphia area with Montgomery County as the highest number.[11]
  • On March 18, the department of health reported the state's first death related to the virus, a patient at St. Luke's Fountain Hill campus in Northampton County.[1][12] As of March 18, there are 133 cases in the state.[13]
  • On March 19, Governor Wolf ordered a statewide shutdown of all "non-life sustaining businesses," with enforcement of this order going into effect at 12:01 am on Saturday, March 21.[14] The PA Department of Education canceled all statewide assessments including the PSSA testing, Keystone exams, and the Pennsylvania Alternate System of Assessment (PASA) for the remainder of the 2019–2020 school year.[15]
  • On March 21, the department of health announced the state's second death as well as 103 new cases. The second death was in Allegheny County.[1]
  • On March 22, 273 new cases were reported, bringing the total to 644. The sixth death occurred in Montgomery County.[16][17]
  • On March 25, A 35-year-old woman in Hanover Township, Luzerne County was arrested for deliberately coughing and spitting on food at a Gerrity's supermarket. She made verbal threats about being infected with Covid-19 and has been charged with two counts of terrorism and two other felonies plus a misdemeanor for attempting to steal a pack of beer. The supermarket had to throw out $35,000 worth of merchandise and has since raised employee pay $1 per hour. The woman is being tested for coronavirus.[18]
  • On March 28, Governor Tom Wolf issued a stay-at-home order for Beaver, Butler, Westmoreland, Centre, and Washington Counties, according to a release from Harrisburg. Governor Wolf announced 533 new cases, bringing the statewide total to 2,751. The highest rise in cases was in Philadelphia County.[1]
  • On April 1, Governor Wolf extended the stay-at-home order across the entire state effective that evening at 8:00 pm.
  • On April 3, Governor Wolf asked Pennsylvanians to wear cloth face coverings in public. Philadelphia reduced recycling pickup to every two weeks due to staff shortages.[19]

Government response

As a result of the coronavirus pandemic, Governor Wolf has implemented social distancing measures in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, and Montgomery counties in the Philadelphia suburbs along with Allegheny County in the Pittsburgh area, which urges non-essential businesses to close, such as malls, movie theaters, and casinos. Essential businesses such as gas stations, grocery stores, and pharmacies will remain open. Essential services such as police, fire, and emergency medical services will be available. Starting March 16, bars and restaurants will be ordered to close to dine-in customers in those counties. Starting March 17, Fine Wine & Good Spirits stores in the four suburban Philadelphia counties will close. In addition, non-essential travel is discouraged. A no visitor policy was implemented for correctional facilities and nursing homes statewide.[11]

On March 22, Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney issued a stay-at-home order for the city, set to take effect the following day at 8:00 am.[20] On Monday the 23rd, Governor Wolf issued additional stay at home orders for seven counties: Allegheny, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, Monroe, and a redundant order for Philadelphia County, to go into effect at 8:00 pm the same day.[21]

  • On March 16, the social distancing measures were extended to the entire state, while Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney ordered nonessential businesses and city government to close for two weeks.[22] Starting March 17, SEPTA Regional Rail trains in the Philadelphia area will operate on an enhanced Saturday schedule for two weeks due to reduced ridership and staffing. In addition, SEPTA will offer refunds for unused and partially used passes.[23]
  • On March 19, the state's department of education announced that all statewide assessments would be canceled for the remainder of the 2019–2020 school year.[24]
  • On March 22, Governor Tom Wolf announced the commonwealth would likely postpone its Democratic and Republican primary elections from April 28 to June 2.[25]

Impact on sports

Most of the state's sports teams were affected. Several leagues began postponing or suspending their seasons starting March 12. Major League Baseball cancelled the remainder of spring training on that date, and on March 16, they announced that the season will be postponed indefinitely, after the recommendations from the CDC to restrict events of more than 50 people for the next eight weeks, affecting the Philadelphia Phillies and Pittsburgh Pirates.[26] Also on March 12, the National Basketball Association announced the season would be suspended for 30 days, affecting the Philadelphia 76ers.[27] In the National Hockey League, the season was suspended for an indefinite amount of time, affecting the Pittsburgh Penguins and Philadelphia Flyers.[28]

In college sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association cancelled all winter and spring tournaments, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[29] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association also canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[30]

Statistics

2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) cases in Pennsylvania[1]

Updated April 3, 2020

County Confirmed cases Deaths
Adams 19 0
Allegheny 476 2
Armstrong 11 0
Beaver 65 2
Bedford 3 0
Berks 201 1
Blair 4 0
Bradford 9 0
Bucks 446 8
Butler 75 2
Cambria 4 0
Cameron 1 0
Carbon 34 1
Centre 32 0
Chester 226 2
Carbon 4 0
Clearfield 5 0
Clinton 1 0
Columbia 15 0
Crawford 5 0
Cumberland 45 2
Dauphin 79 1
Delaware 542 10
Erie 17 0
Fayette 20 1
Forest 1 0
Franklin 26 0
Greene 11 0
Huntingdon 3 0
Indiana 7 0
Juniata 5 0
Lackawanna 119 4
Lancaster 232 5
Lawrence 19 2
Lebanon 54 0
Lehigh 584 5
Luzerne 484 5
Lycoming 8 0
Mckean 1 0
Mercer 10 0
Mifflin 2 0
Monroe 397 10
Montgomery 875 11
Montour 16 0
Northampton 466 10
Northumberland 8 0
Perry 4 1
Philadelphia 2,284 14
Pike 83 1
Potter 2 0
Schuylkill 63 0
Snyder 4 1
Somerset 3 0
Susquehanna 4 0
Tioga 3 0
Union 3 0
Venango 3 0
Warren 1 0
Washington 40 0
Wayne 23 0
Westmoreland 110 0
Wyoming 2 0
York 121 1
Total 8,420 102

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Coronavirus". PA Department of Health. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  2. ^ "Coronavirus". PA Department of Health. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  3. ^ "Wolf Administration Confirms Two Presumptive Positive Cases of COVID-19" (Press release). Pennsylvania Office of the Governor. March 6, 2020. Archived from the original on March 7, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  4. ^ "2 presumed positive coronavirus cases in Pa., including Delaware County". WPVI. March 6, 2020. Archived from the original on March 6, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  5. ^ "Pennsylvania now has 2 confirmed cases of coronavirus". AP via WHYY. March 6, 2020. Archived from the original on March 7, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  6. ^ Parker, Randy (March 6, 2020). "Pa. confirms 'presumed positive' cases of the coronavirus". York Daily Record. Archived from the original on March 7, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  7. ^ Stamm, Dan (March 6, 2020). "Pennsylvania Reports 2 Coronavirus Cases, 1 in Delaware County". WCAU-TV. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  8. ^ Staff, WESA. "LIVE BLOG: Coronavirus In Pittsburgh, March 9–15". www.wesa.fm. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  9. ^ "Pennsylvania, Delaware Close All Schools Due to Outbreak". WCAU. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  10. ^ PA cancels public park programs in light of COVID-19 Archived March 14, 2020, at the Wayback Machine Pocono Record
  11. ^ a b "Coronavirus PA: State announces 16 new COVID-19 cases, bringing total to at least 63 across the commonwealth". Philadelphia, PA: WPVI-TV. March 15, 2020. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  12. ^ lehighvalleylive.com, Steve Novak | For (March 18, 2020). "1st coronavirus death in Pennsylvania is from Lehigh Valley". lehighvalleylive. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  13. ^ "First coronavirus death reported in Pennsylvania; 133 cases total reported statewide". WTAE. March 19, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  14. ^ "ALL NON-LIFE-SUSTAINING BUSINESSES IN PENNSYLVANIA TO CLOSE PHYSICAL LOCATIONS AS OF 8 PM TODAY TO SLOW SPREAD OF COVID-19". Governor Tom Wolf. March 19, 2020. Archived from the original on March 20, 2020. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  15. ^ "Coronavirus Latest: Pennsylvania Department Of Education Cancels Statewide Assessments". March 19, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  16. ^ Staff, WPXI com News. "LIVE UPDATES: Coronavirus in Pa.: Stay-at-home order issued for Allegheny Co. as amount of cases across state rises to 644". WPXI. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  17. ^ Staff, WPXI com News. "TIMELINE: Pennsylvania coronavirus updates March 22". WPXI. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  18. ^ Woman who coughed on $35K worth of grocery store food faces felony charges by Elisha Fieldstadt, NBC News, 27 March 2020
  19. ^ Coronavirus update: Gov. Tom Wolf asks Pennsylvanians to wear masks outdoors
  20. ^ Gammage, Jeff (March 22, 2020). "Philadelphia issues 'stay at home' order; Wolf says shutdowns could last longer as pandemic grows". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved March 23, 2020.
  21. ^ Coloumbis, Angela; McDaniel, Justine (March 23, 2020). "Pa. Gov. Tom Wolf extends school closures until early April, issues stay-at-home order for 7 counties". Spotlight PA. Retrieved March 23, 2020.
  22. ^ "Governor Wolf extends COVID-19 shutdown across Pennsylvania". Philadelphia, PA: WPVI-TV. March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  23. ^ Madej, Patricia (March 16, 2020). "SEPTA adjusts Regional Rail schedules amid coronavirus, offers some refunds for riders". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  24. ^ "Pa. Department of Education cancels statewide assessments". ABC27. March 19, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  25. ^ Lai, Jonathan; Brennan, Chris; Angela, Couloumbis (March 22, 2020). "Pennsylvania governor, legislative leaders reach deal to postpone 2020 primary for coronavirus". Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on March 23, 2020. Retrieved March 23, 2020.
  26. ^ Feinsand, Mark (March 16, 2020). "Opening of regular season to be pushed back". MLB.com. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  27. ^ "Silver: NBA hiatus likely to last 'at least' 30 days". ESPN.com. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  28. ^ NHL statement on coronavirus Archived March 14, 2020, at the Wayback Machine NHL, March 12, 2020
  29. ^ NCAA cancels remaining winter and spring championships Archived March 12, 2020, at the Wayback Machine NCAA, March 12, 2020
  30. ^ NJCAA cancels spring sports, basketball nationals amid coronavirus outbreak Archived March 18, 2020, at the Wayback Machine MLive.com, March 16, 2020

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