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2020 coronavirus pandemic in Malaysia

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2020 coronavirus pandemic in Malaysia
COVID-19 Outbreak Cases in Malaysia (Density).svg
Distribution map of COVID-19 confirmed cases by state (territory)
COVID-19 Outbreak Cases in Malaysia (Density and Districts).svg
Distribution map of COVID-19 confirmed cases by district (city)
COVID-19 outbreak Malaysia per capita cases map.svg
Density map of COVID-19 confirmed cases by state (territory)
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationMalaysia
First outbreakWuhan, Hubei, China
Index caseSungai Buloh, Selangor
Arrival date25 January 2020
(2 months, 1 week and 1 day)
Confirmed cases3,116[1][2]
Suspected cases40,483
Recovered767[1][2]
Deaths
50[1][2]
Total ILI cases79
Official website
www.moh.gov.my/2019-ncov-wuhan
Suspected cases have not been confirmed as being due to this strain by laboratory tests, although some other strains may have been ruled out.

The 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic was first identified to have spread to Malaysia on 25 January 2020.[3][4] Reported cases remained relatively low until a large spike in cases in March 2020, most of them linked to a religious event held in Kuala Lumpur in late February and early March.[5] Within a few weeks after the event, Malaysia had become the country with the highest cumulative number of confirmed COVID-19 infections in South East Asia.[6] As of 2 April 2020, there are 3,116 confirmed cases in the country, with 50 deaths reported.[1]

Malaysia's Yang di-Pertuan Agong expressed his greatest concerns over the jump in positive cases in early March.[7][8] Measures were then announced by the Prime Minister of Malaysia to counter the spread of the virus within the country in a live nationwide telecast on 13 March 2020.[9][10] With the spread of the virus into all of Malaysian states and federal territories by 16 March, the Malaysian government announced that it has decided to implement a "Movement Control Order" from 18 March to 31 March to curb the further growth of positive cases in the country through social distancing.[11][12][13] The Attorney-General's Chambers (AGC) of Malaysia also published a federal gazette on 18 March 2020 that bars individuals from travelling to another place with all states in the country have been gazetted as coronavirus-affected area.[14] On 25 March, the government extended the Movement Control Order from 1 April to 14 April 2020 in an attempt to curb the rapid rise in number of cases.[15] There have, however, been considerations of a further lockdown until late April or May, due to the anticipated spike in cases (most likely attributed to a lack of compliance to the March-April MCO).

Nomenclature

The Ministry of Health originally referred to this disease as the "2019 Novel Coronavirus".[16] Some media referred this disease as "Wuhan Coronavirus".[17] During the onset of the outbreak, the Malaysian media called it the "radang paru-paru Wuhan" in Malay, meaning "Wuhan Pneunomia".[18] Then some media changed the name to "radang paru-paru koronavirus baru" (new coronavirus pneumonia) in Malay.[19] The Ministry of Health and most media now refer to the disease as "COVID-19", as suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO) on 11 February 2020.[20]

Cases

COVID-19 cases in Malaysia  ()
     Deaths        Recoveries        Active cases

Jan Jan Feb Feb Mar Mar Apr Apr Last 15 days Last 15 days

Date
# of cases
(%)
2020-01-24
3(n.a.) (n.a.)
2020-01-25
4(+1) (+33%)
2020-01-26
4(=) (=)
2020-01-27
6(+2) (+50%)
2020-01-28
8(+2) (+33%)
8(=) (=)
2020-02-03
9(+1) (+12%)
2020-02-04
12(+3) (+33%)
2020-02-05
14(+2) (+16%)
2020-02-06
14(=) (=)
2020-02-07
15(+1) (+7%)
2020-02-08
16(+1) (+6%)
2020-02-09
18(+2) (+13%)
18(=) (=)
2020-02-12
19(+1) (+5%)
2020-02-13
19(=) (=)
2020-02-14
21(+2) (+11%)
2020-02-15
21(=) (=)
2020-02-16
22(+1) (+5%)
2020-02-17
22(=) (=)
2020-02-18
22(=) (=)
2020-02-19
22(=) (=)
22(=) (=)
2020-02-23
22(=) (=)
2020-02-24
22(=) (=)
22(=) (=)
2020-02-27
24(+2) (+9%)
2020-02-28
25(+1) (+4%)
2020-02-29
29(+4) (+16%)
2020-03-01
29(=) (=)
2020-03-02
33(+4) (+14%)
2020-03-03
36(+3) (+9%)
2020-03-04
50(+14) (+39%)
2020-03-05
55(+5) (+10%)
2020-03-06
83(+28) (+51%)
2020-03-07
93(+10) (+12%)
2020-03-08
99(+6) (+6%)
2020-03-09
118(+19) (+19%)
2020-03-10
130(+12) (+10%)
2020-03-11
149(+19) (+15%)
2020-03-12
158(+9) (+6%)
2020-03-13
200(+42) (+27%)
2020-03-14
242(+42) (+21%)
2020-03-15
428(+186) (+77%)
2020-03-16
553(+125) (+29%)
2020-03-17
673(+120) (+22%)
2020-03-18
790(+117) (+17%)
2020-03-19
900(+110) (+14%)
2020-03-20
1,030(+130) (+14%)
2020-03-21
1,183(+153) (+15%)
2020-03-22
1,306(+123) (+10%)
2020-03-23
1,518(+212) (+16%)
2020-03-24
1,624(+106) (+7%)
2020-03-25
1,796(+172) (+11%)
2020-03-26
2,031(+235) (+13%)
2020-03-27
2,161(+130) (+6%)
2020-03-28
2,320(+159) (+7%)
2020-03-29
2,470(+150) (+6%)
2020-03-30
2,626(+156) (+6%)
2020-03-31
2,766(+140) (+5%)
2020-04-01
2,908(+142) (+5%)
2020-04-02
3,116(+208) (+7%)

Summary

As of 2 April 2020, there were 208 new cases with 122 new recoveries and 5 new deaths, bringing the tally to 3,116 confirmed cases, 767 recovered cases and 50 confirmed deaths.[21]

Examination Data
Case Positive Negative Pending Suspected
PUI 830 5,810 2,884 9,524
Close contact 774 11,600 877 13,311
Humanitarian action 2 450 7 459
ILI and SARI 103 6,463 38 6,604
Tabligh 1,407 10,000 3,973 15,380
Cruise 0 100 0 100
Total 3,116 34,483 7,779 45,378
The above data was issued by the Ministry of Health, as of 2 April 2020.[22]

Cases by state

Currently all administrative regions have confirmed cases. The statistics released before 3 March 2020 detailed each patient information and hospitalised location. Between 3 March until 13 March 2020, no data were released. Since 13 March 2020, Ministry of Health starts to announce cumulative confirmed cases of each state.

Distribution of cumulative confirmed cases in various administrative regions of Malaysia
Date JH KD KE ML NS PH PG PK PR SB SR SE TR KL PT LB Source
25/1 1 3
28/1 2(1) 1 4(1)
30/1 3(1) 1 4
3/2 3 1 5(1) 1
5/2 3 2(1) 2 5 2(1)
6/2 4(1) 2 2 5 2
7/2 4 2 2 5 3(1)
8/2 4 2 2 6(1) 3(1)
9/2 4 2 2 7(1) 3(1)
13/2 4 2 2 7 4(1)
14/2 4 4(2) 2 7 4
15/2 4 4 2 8(1) 4
27/2 4 4 2 8 5(1)
28/2 4 4 2 9(1) 6(1)
1/3 4 4 2 12(3) 7(1)
3/3 4 4 2 17(5) 9(2)
4/3-12/3 N/A
13/3 20 5 3 1 11 2 7 2 1 15 87 40 1 2 [23]
14/3 22(2) 5 3 6(5) 19(8) 2 7 2 2(1) 26(11) 6(6) 92(5) 43(3) 1 2 [24]
15/3 N/A
16/3 52 31 18 14 42 19 15 18 8 57 21 144 4 106 4 [25]
17/3 77(25) 31 25(7) 17(3) 45(3) 28(9) 23(8) 23(5) 8 82(25) 29(8) 161(17) 7(3) 113(7) 4 [26]
18/3 88(11) 36(5) 30(5) 18(1) 45 29(1) 30(7) 28(5) 8 103(21) 49(20) 192(31) 10(3) 119(6) 5(1) [27]
19/3 101(13) 40(4) 44(14) 20(2) 55(10) 32(3) 32(2) 35(7) 9(1) 112(9) 51(2) 223(31) 11(1) 123 6 5 [28]
20/3 114(13) 41(1) 51(7) 22(2) 65(10) 36(4) 37(5) 45(10) 9 119(7) 58(7) 263(40) 20(9) 139(16) 6 5 [29]
21/3 129(15) 47(6) 61(10) 22 70(5) 37(1) 50(13) 55(10) 9 136(17) 68(10) 292(29) 27(7) 166(27) 9(3) 5 [30]
22/3 145(16) 52(5) 63(2) 23(1) 78(8) 40(3) 58(8) 66(11) 9 158(22) 76(8) 309(17) 32(5) 183(17) 9 5 [31]
23/3 158(13) 59(7) 71(8) 25(2) 94(16) 56(16) 66(8) 81(15) 9 169(11) 78(2) 354(45) 38(6) 242(59) 13(4) 5 [32]
24/3 162(4) 64(5) 78(7) 31(6) 109(15) 56 68(2) 98(17) 9 170(1) 83(5) 381(27) 38 257(15) 15(2) 5 [33]
25/3 196(34) 69(5) 84(6) 33(2) 123(14) 64(8) 70(2) 128(30) 10(1) 170 85(2) 435(54) 38 270(13) 16(1) 5 [34]
26/3 239(43) 72(3) 94(10) 33 132(9) 66(2) 74(4) 151(23) 10 172(2) 95(10) 510(75) 39(1) 321(51) 18(2) 5 [35]
27/3 259(20) 73(1) 98(4) 33 138(6) 70(4) 80(6) 159(8) 10 182(10) 110(15) 546(36) 41(2) 337(16) 20(2) 5 [36]
28/3 285(26) 74(1) 108(10) 42(9) 153(15) 84(14) 86(6) 165(6) 10 197(15) 118(8) 579(33) 45(4) 344(7) 20 10(5) [37]
29/3 309(24) 75(1) 123(15) 43(1) 162(9) 96(12) 87(1) 176(11) 10 197 129(11) 612(33) 47(2) 372(28) 22(2) 10 [38]
30/3 333(24) 77(2) 127(4) 50(7) 172(10) 99(3) 88(1) 184(8) 11(1) 201(4) 135(6) 672(60) 47 396(24) 24(2) 10 [39]
31/3 349(16) 77 131(4) 52(2) 181(9) 102(3) 94(6) 189(5) 12(1) 206(5) 156(21) 704(32) 47 430(34) 26(2) 10 [40]
1/4 368(19) 79(2) 134(3) 63(11) 189(8) 111(9) 96(2) 194(5) 12 209(3) 188(32) 726(22) 48(1) 455(25) 26 10 [41]
2/4 395(27) 80(1) 137(3) 70(7) 207(18) 114(3) 98(2) 200(6) 12 210(1) 211(23) 800(74) 50(2) 488(33) 34(8) 10 [21]
Date JH KD KE ML NS PH PG PK PR SB SR SE TR KL PT LB Source
Distribution of cumulative confirmed cases in various districts (cities) of Malaysia
State District/City Number
21/3
[42]
23/3 24/3
[43]
25/3
[44]
26/3
[45]
27/3
[46]
28/3
[47]
29/3
[48]
30/3
[49]
31/3
[50]
1/4
[51]
 Johor Batu Pahat 23 28 29 30 30 34 36 37 39 44
Johor Bahru 52 59 68 73 80 87 105 108 112 118
Kluang 26 31 54 83 83 97 97 106 107 111
Kota Tinggi 4 5 7 7 7 10 12 12 12
Kulai 5 10 10 14 18 19 19 21 23 23
Mersing 1 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 4
Muar 13 15 15 15 15 18 18 21 27 28
Pontian 3 7 7 8 11 11 11 12 12 13
Segamat 1 3 3 3 4 5 5 8 9 10
Tangkak 3 3 3 3 3 4 5 5 5 5
Unknown 3 5
 Kedah Baling 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Bandar Baharu 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Kota Setar
(including Pokok Sena)
10 15 19 22 22 22 22 22 22 22
Kuala Muda 23 27 28 28 29 29 30 30 30 30
Kubang Pasu 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 8
Kulim 1 5 5 5 5 5 5 7 7 8
Langkawi 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4
Padang Terap 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Pendang 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Sik 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
 Kelantan Bachok 7 8 8 9 9 9 10 10 10 10
Gua Musang 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
Jeli 1
Kota Bharu 29 43 48 55 58 68 76 79 80 82
Kuala Krai 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 10 11
Pasir Mas 9 9 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 9
Pasir Puteh 4 5 6 6 6 6 6 7 8 7
Tanah Merah 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 4
Tumpat 3 3 3 4 4 4 7 7 8 8
 Malacca Alor Gajah 6 6 8 8 8 9 9 14 14 18
Central Malacca 5 7 7 7 7 16 16 18 19 21
Jasin 11 15 16 16 16 17 18 18 19 24
Unknown 2 2 2 2
 Negeri Sembilan Jelebu 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Jempol 1 1 1 3 3 3 4 4 4 5
Kuala Pilah 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Port Dickson 3 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6
Rembau 10 12 20 20 21 26 26 26 33 35
Seremban 42 74 78 85 92 101 108 118 119 124
Tampin 10 11 13 13 13 14 14 14 15 15
AKEPT (Evacuation) 2 2 2 2
 Pahang Bentong 4 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6
Bera 1 1 4 4 6 10 9 9 9 9
Cameron Highlands 1 1 1 1 1 2
Jerantut 7 17 17 17 17 26 27 27 27 33
Kuantan 11 12 13 13 15 15 19 21 24 24
Lipis 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 3
Maran 1 1 2 2 2 3 5 5 5 5
Pekan 13 17 18 18 18 18 20 20 20 21
Raub 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Rompin 1 2 2 2
Temerloh 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 5
 Penang Central Seberang Perai 16 22 22 23 23 28 30 30 30 32 34
North Seberang Perai 9 11 11 11 12 12 12 12 15 15
South Seberang Perai 9 9 9 12 9 9 9 10 11 11
Northeast Penang Island 34 19 19 20 20 23 26 27 27 27 27
Southwest Penang Island 7 7 7 8 8 9 9 9 9 9
 Perak Batang Padang 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Hilir Perak
(including Bagan Datuk)
13 32 48 52 53 53 52 56 57 60
Hulu Perak 2 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5
Kerian 7 7 9 9 9 12 13 13 13 13
Kinta 21 34 41 56 63 66 75 76 77 77
Kuala Kangsar 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2
Larut, Matang and Selama 3 5 5 8 8 8 10 11 11 12
Manjung 4 7 8 9 9 9 9 11 12 13
Muallim 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2
Central Perak 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7
 Perlis 9 9 10 10 10 10 10 11 12 12
 Selangor Gombak 38 50 53 54 55 57 59 59 62 63
Hulu Langat 75 103 132 186 202 206 209 258 265 273
Hulu Selangor 3 5 7 7 7 9 10 10 12 16
Klang 23 28 35 44 46 51 62 70 74 76
Kuala Langat 8 8 10 12 14 14 15 15 16 16
Kuala Selangor 17 17 18 18 18 18 18 18 19 19
Petaling 96 158 167 176 190 209 223 224 234 242
Sabak Bernam 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 4
Sepang 8 9 9 9 10 11 12 14 17 17
Unknown 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
 Terengganu Besut 7 12 12 13 14 14 16 16 16 17
Dungun 5 5 5 5 6 8 8 8 8 8
Kemaman 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3
Kuala Nerus 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Kuala Terengganu 12 16 16 16 16 17 17 17 17 17
Marang 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Setiu 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Federal Territories Cheras
(including Bandar Tun Razak)
11 11 16 19 25 25 28 31 33 35
Kepong
(including Segambut and Batu)
24 32 38 45 47 50 68 75 84 91
Labuan 5 5 5 5 5 10 10 10 10 10
Lembah Pantai
(including Bukit Bintang and Seputeh)[52]
90 167 167 208 215 218 219 226 238 249
Putrajaya 9 15 16 18 20 20 22 24 26 26
Titiwangsa
(including Wangsa Maju and Setiawangsa)
41 46 49 49 50 51 57 64 75 80
 Sabah Beaufort 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 7
Keningau 1 1
Kinabatangan 11 11 11 11 11 11 14 14 14 14 14
Kota Belud 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5
Kota Kinabalu 17 24 24 24 25 27 30 30 29 29 29
Kunak 5 5 5 5 5 7 7 7 7 7 7
Lahad Datu 32 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 35 35
Papar 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
Penampang 1 1 2
Putatan 3 4 4 4 4 6 6 6 7 7 7
Ranau 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
Sandakan 8 11 11 11 11 11 15 15 15 16 17
Semporna 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2
Sipitang 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
Tambunan 1 1 1
Tawau 37 48 49 49 50 53 57 57 60 63 63
Tuaran 6 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12
 Sarawak Betong 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 9 9 9
Bintulu 4 4 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6
Kuching 30 44 45 52 66 72 78 81 97 128
Lawas 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Limbang 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6
Miri 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 10 10 10
Mukah 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
Samarahan 1 2 2 3 4 4 9 9 11 12
Sarikei 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5
Serian 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4
Sibu 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3
Simunjan 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Sri Aman 1 1

COVID-19 cases in Malaysia

Details of the confirmed cases in Malaysia (As of 10 March 2020)[53][54]
Case Relationship group Date of diagnosis Date of discharged Age Nationality Patient data Status
1 G1 25 January 2020 14 February 2020 65  China A Chinese female national from Wuhan. She was quarantined in a hotel in the forest city of Johor's Iskandar Puteri after entering the Tuas Checkpoint in Singapore with seven other relatives. She is the wife of the first positive infected patient in Singapore. At first she was negatively diagnosed with the new coronavirus, but on 25 January, the Malaysian Health Ministry confirmed she is positive with the new coronavirus where she subsequently warded at Sungai Buloh Hospital of Selangor.[55][56] She was discharged from hospital on 14 February.[57] Discharged
2 G1 25 January 2020 14 February 2020 11  China A Chinese male national from Wuhan. He was quarantined in a hotel in the forest city of Johor's Iskandar Puteri after entering the Tuas Checkpoint in Singapore with seven other relatives. He is the grandson of the first positive infected patient in Singapore. At first he was negatively diagnosed with the new coronavirus, but on 25 January, the Malaysian Health Ministry confirmed he is positive with the new coronavirus where he subsequently warded at Sungai Buloh Hospital of Selangor.[55][56] He was discharged from hospital on 14 February.[57] Discharged
3 G1 25 January 2020 14 February 2020 2  China A Chinese male national from Wuhan. He was quarantined in a hotel in the forest city of Johor's Iskandar Puteri after entering the Tuas Checkpoint in Singapore with seven other relatives. He is the grandson of the first positive infected patient in Singapore. At first he was negatively diagnosed with the new coronavirus, but on 25 January, the Malaysian Health Ministry confirmed he is positive with the new coronavirus.[55][56] He was discharged from hospital on 14 February.[57] Discharged
4 25 January 2020 8 February 2020 40  China A Chinese male national from Wuhan. Took a bus from Singapore to Johor's capital of Johor Bahru on 22 January via the Woodlands Checkpoint in Singapore. He had a fever on 23 January and went to a private hospital for examination before being referred into Sultanah Aminah Hospital. After the diagnosis confirmed he was infected with similar virus, he was referred to Permai Hospital for further treatment. On 8 February after doctors treated him with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drugs on 28 January,[58] the patient finally allowed to leave the hospital after being tested negative three times.[59] Discharged
5 G1 28 January 2020 14 February 2020 36  China A Chinese female national from Wuhan. She was quarantined in a hotel in the forest city of Johor's Iskandar Puteri after entering the Tuas Checkpoint in Singapore with seven other relatives. She is the daughter-in-law of the first positive infected patient in Singapore. Earlier, she had a negative test result and stayed at Sungai Buloh Hospital to take care of her two children who were diagnosed where she was later confirmed to be infected as well. She was discharged from the hospital on 14 February.[57] Discharged
6 28 January 2020 4 February 2020 4  China A Chinese female national from Guangzhou. On 26 January, she went to Langkawi with her two-year-old sister despite already being sick. She was later confirmed to be infected on 28 January. On 4 February, she was released from hospital after successfully being cured with her latest tests were negative for the virus.[59][60] Discharged
7 G2 28 January 2020 18 February 2020 52  China A Chinese male national. The husband of the 8th patient. Earlier tested positive for the virus on 30 January and warded at Permai Hospital of Johor. He was discharged from the hospital on 18 February.[61][62] Discharged
8 G2 30 January 2020 18 February 2020 49  China A Chinese female national. The wife of the 7th patient. Earlier tested positive for the virus on 30 January and warded at Permai Hospital of Johor. She was discharged from the hospital on 18 February.[61][62] Discharged
9 G3 3 February 2020 17 February 2020 41  Malaysia A Malaysian male national from Subang Jaya of Selangor. The first local cases involving Malaysian citizen, earlier he travelled to the Grand Hyatt Singapore from 16 to 23 January to attend an international conference with at least one person from Wuhan. On 29 January, he went to a private medical institution in Selangor for medical check-up due to fever and cough. He was subsequently admitted to Sungai Buloh Hospital for isolation and observation on 2 February and was diagnosed with the virus. On 17 February, the patient recovered and was released from hospital, becoming the first Malaysian citizen cured from the virus.[63] Discharged
10 3 February 2020 9 February 2020 63  China A Chinese male national from Wuhan. On 18 January, he and his family entered from Xiamen of Fujian via Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA). On 23 January, he developed mild fever and was treated at the Kuala Lumpur Hospital. He was discharged from the hospital on 9 February with the patient was not given any anti-viral medicine to cure the illness. Earlier, two repeat tests conducted on him between 7 and 8 February also showed negative.[59] Discharged
11 G4 5 February 2020 18 February 2020 45  Malaysia A Malaysian male national from Wuhan who returned to Malaysia after the evacuation operation on 4 February. He did not show any symptoms during the physical examination procedures at KLIA. Subsequent testing on a quarantine centre in Nilai of Negeri Sembilan revealed that he and his son were positive for the new coronavirus. They were then being referred to an isolation ward at Tuanku Ja'afar Hospital in Seremban for further treatment.[64] He was discharged from the hospital on 18 February.[65] Discharged
12 G4 5 February 2020 18 February 2020 9  Malaysia A Malaysian male national from Wuhan who returned to Malaysia after the evacuation operation on 4 February. He did not show any symptoms during the physical examination procedures at KLIA. Subsequent testing on a quarantine centre in Nilai of Negeri Sembilan revealed that he and his father were positive for the new coronavirus. They were then being referred to an isolation ward at Tuanku Ja'afar Hospital in Seremban for further treatment.[64] He was discharged from the hospital on 18 February.[65] Discharged
13 G3 5 February 2020 22 February 2020 40  Malaysia A Malaysian female national who recently visited by her infected brother (the 9th patient) in Kedah's Sungai Petani during Chinese New Year on 23 January. She later developed symptoms of fever, throat pain and cough where she went to a private clinic for treatment.[66] A test on her found she is positive with coronavirus and her brother who also positive with the virus was contacted by the country health officials immediately after her diagnosis.[67] The woman became the first locally transmitted case despite her other family members tested negative for the virus.[68] She is warded at the Sultanah Bahiyah Hospital of Kedah and discharged on 22 February after recovering from the virus.[69][70][71] Discharged
14 G5 5 February 2020 24 February 2020 37  China A Chinese female national from Wuhan. On 25 January, she entered Malaysia with her mother (the 19th patient) and three friends where they toured around Kuala Lumpur.[72] On 1 February, she went to Kuala Lumpur Hospital for treatment because of a slight fever. The doctor allowed her to go home to rest after prescribing the medicine but ordered her and her group to stay indoors and isolate. The county health officials continued to monitor the woman and found that her condition persisted until 5 February, she was referred again to Kuala Lumpur Hospital and later diagnosed with the virus on the same day.[66] She was discharged from the hospital on 24 February.[73] Discharged
15 6 February 2020 16 February 2020 59  China A Chinese female national from Wuhan, arrived in Singapore with her husband, son and daughter-in-law on 17 January and passed through Johor Bahru on 21 January to Malaysia. She developed fever on 26 January but did not go to any medical centre for treatment. She only took antipyretic herself and stayed indoors. She had planned to fly with her son and daughter-in-law from Johor Bahru to Guangzhou on 4 February but was not accompanied by her husband due to physical discomfort. On 5 February, the management of her residence reported her condition to the country health department. She was subsequently taken to the hospital and confirmed infected with the virus. She was discharged from hospital on 16 February after recovering.[74] Discharged
16 G5 7 February 2020 27 February 2020 67  China A Chinese female national from Wuhan. The mother of 14th infected patient and also a friend to the 19th infected patient.[72] She was discharged from hospital on 27 February.[75] Discharged
17 G3 8 February 2020 19 February 2020 65  Malaysia A Malaysian female national who recently eating at the same table with the 9th confirmed patient during the Chinese New Year. Began to feel uncomfortable on 5 February with dizziness and night sweats but no fever. A diagnosis on her was confirmed on 8 February where she herself suffers from various chronic diseases, including hypertension, diabetes, paraplegia etc., and is also a heart patient with a pacemaker. She was discharged from hospital on 19 February.[76] Discharged
18 9 February 2020 19 February 2020 31  Malaysia A Malaysian male national from Kuala Langat District of Selangor. He worked in Macau and had been to mainland China on 1 February where he later developed cough symptoms on 7 February. He was admitted to a hospital in Malaysia on the same day and was diagnosed with the virus on 9 February.[77] After achieving a full recovery, he was discharged from the hospital on 19 February.[76] Discharged
19 G5 13 February 2020 24 February 2020 39  China A Chinese female national from Wuhan. Arrived in Malaysia with four relatives and friends on 25 January. She had fever and cough on 12 February and was diagnosed with the virus on 13 February.[72] After successfully being cured through treatment, she was discharged from hospital on 24 February.[73] Discharged
20 14 February 2020 19 February 2020 27  China A Chinese male national from Guangzhou came to Malaysia to do business on 1 February, went to Thailand on 12 February and passed the border checkpoint in Kedah the following day. When returned to Malaysia, he had a fever and sent to hospital for screening.[78] He was diagnosed positive with the virus on 14 February before being discharged from hospital on 19 February after undergoing treatment.[79] Discharged
21 14 February 2020 20 February 2020 32  China A Chinese female national settled in Malaysia and married a local Malaysian. She returned to visit relatives in China from 22 to 30 January before developing sore throat symptoms on 13 February and diagnosed with the virus after being sent to hospital for testing.[78] She was discharged from hospital on 20 February. Discharged
22 15 February 2020 27 February 2020 83  United States An American female national who is part of the MS Westerdam passenger. After disembarking from Cambodia on 13 February and passing the medical examination, she was allowed to return into her country by the Cambodian authorities. As Cambodia did not have any direct flights to Europe and the United States, she was flown to Malaysia on 14 February with other 144 passengers on board. She was diagnosed with abnormal temperature screening during arrival in KLIA and subsequently sent to Sungai Buloh Hospital of Selangor for examination where she is confirmed to be infected with the virus. She is still in the hospital for further treatment on other illnesses despite additional tests showing that she is now clear from the virus.[80] She was finally discharged from hospital on 27 February.[75] Discharged
23 27 February 2020 53  Malaysia A Malaysian female national who arriving back from Japan on 23 February developed fever symptoms the following day, and received treatment in a hospital in Kuala Lumpur. A coronavirus infection test was done, and it was found to be positive on 27 February.[81][82] In Patient
24 28 February 2020 6 March 2020 41  Japan A Japanese female national who works in Malaysia in the capital city of Kuala Lumpur.[83] The woman recently returned to Japan in January and travel to Indonesia in February before being diagnosed with the virus on 28 February.[84] She was subsequently warded at the Kuala Lumpur Hospital. This case is linked to the first positive coronavirus case in Indonesia.[85] After recovering, the woman was discharged from hospital on 6 March. Discharged
25 28 February 2020 54  Italy An Italian male national who married to a Malaysian spouse.[83] The man has a travel history to Italy from 15–21 February for working purposes.[84] On 28 February after he was diagnosed with the virus, the patient was subsequently warded in Sungai Buloh Hospital of Selangor. In Patient
26 1 March 2020 52  Malaysia A Malaysian male national who has a travel history to Shanghai of China in mid-January, began to developing sore throat and fever symptoms where he sought treatment at an outpatient private hospital. On 1 March after he was diagnosed with the virus, the patient was subsequently warded in Sungai Buloh Hospital of Selangor. He have attended farewell ceremony for former minister and deputy minister but both of them reported have negative result from the virus.[86][87][88] In Patient
27 1 March 2020 12 March 2020 20  Malaysia A Malaysian female national who serve as a trainee nurse at a private hospital and treating the 24th case patient without any protection equipment, she began to developing symptoms from 27 February and subsequently warded in Kuala Lumpur Hospital.[86][87][88] Discharged
28 1 March 2020 12 March 2020 45  Malaysia A Malaysian male national who is a colleague of the 25th patient.[86][87][88] Discharged
29 1 March 2020 35  Malaysia A Malaysian female national who was admitted into a private hospital on 21 February and place in one room with the 24th case patient, whose situation was not known at the time. She was allowed to return home on 25 February but started to feeling unwell and developing cough and fever symptoms by 27 February without seeking any treatment. She was traced during closed contact tracing for the case 24th.[86][87][88] In Patient
30 3 March 2020 38  Malaysia A Malaysian male national who travelled to Australia from 12 to 16 February. He also has close contact with 26th case and was tested positive on 2 March. In Patient
31 3 March 2020 12 March 2020 50  Malaysia A Malaysian male national who has close contact with 26th case. He does not has any recent travel record and was tested positive on 2 March. Discharged
32 3 March 2020 12 March 2020 43  Malaysia A Malaysian female national who has close contact with 26th case. She does not has any recent travel record and was tested positive on 2 March. Discharged
33 3 March 2020 58  Malaysia A Malaysian male national who recently travelled to Kuching, Sarawak for a meeting on 16 February. He also has close contact with 26th case and was tested positive on 2 March. In Patient
34 3 March 2020 12 March 2020 40  Malaysia A Malaysian male national who serve as a paramedic in Sungai Buloh Hospital, Selangor provided treatment to the 26th case. He was tested positive on 2 March and warded in Sungai Buloh Hospital. Discharged
35 3 March 2020 12 March 2020 50  Malaysia A Malaysian female national who recently travelled to Australia from 13 January to 16 February. She also has close contact with 26th case and was tested positive on 2 March. She was warded in Sungai Buloh Hospital. Discharged
36 3 March 2020 49  Malaysia A Malaysian male national who recently travelled to Egypt from 23 January to 1 February. He also has close contact with 26th case and was tested positive on 2 March. He was warded in Sungai Buloh Hospital. In Patient
37 4 March 2020 63  Malaysia Related with case number 26. In Patient
38 4 March 2020 60  Malaysia Related with case number 26. In Patient
39 4 March 2020 45  Malaysia Friend of 36th case. A second generation patient from 26th case. In Patient
40 4 March 2020 49  Malaysia Related with case number 26. In Patient
41 4 March 2020 8 March 2020 27  Malaysia Related with case number 26. The patient was discharged from Kuala Lumpur Hospital on 8 March. Discharged
42 4 March 2020 38  Malaysia Friend of 38th case. A second generation patient from 26th case. In Patient
43 4 March 2020 59  Malaysia A Malaysian female national who is the wife of 33rd case. She is a second generation patient from 26th case. In Patient
44 4 March 2020 62  Malaysia A Malaysian female national who is the wife of 47th case. She is a second generation patient of case 47. In Patient
45 4 March 2020 30  Malaysia Staff of 26th case. In Patient
46 4 March 2020 41  Malaysia Related with case number 26. In Patient
47 4 March 2020 62  Malaysia Related with case number 26. In Patient
48 4 March 2020 55  Malaysia Related with case number 26. In Patient
49 4 March 2020 51  Malaysia Related with case number 26. In Patient
50 4 March 2020 56  Malaysia Related with case number 26. In Patient
51 5 March 2020 9  Malaysia Child of 32nd case. A second generation patient from 26th case. In Patient
52 5 March 2020 42  Malaysia Driver of 33rd case. A second generation patient from 26th case. In Patient
53 5 March 2020 12 March 2020 50  Malaysia Staff of 33rd case. A second generation patient from 26th case. Discharged
54 5 March 2020 40  Malaysia Related to 26th case. In Patient
55 5 March 2020 36  Malaysia Driver of 26th case. In Patient
56 6 March 2020 50  Malaysia Related to 32nd case. A second generation patient to 26th case. In Patient
57 6 March 2020 16  Malaysia Related to 38th case. A second generation patient to 26th case. In Patient
58 6 March 2020 29  Malaysia Related to 38th case. A second generation patient to 26th case. In Patient
59 6 March 2020 61  Malaysia Related to 38th case. A second generation patient to 26th case. In Patient
60 6 March 2020 63  Malaysia Related to 26th case. In Patient
61 6 March 2020 14 March 2020 58  Malaysia Related to 33rd case. A second generation patient to 26th case. Discharged
62 6 March 2020 50  Malaysia Related to 33rd case. A second generation patient to 26th case. In Patient
63 6 March 2020 8  Malaysia Related to 39th case. A third generation patient after 26th and 39th case. In Patient
64 6 March 2020 28  Malaysia Related to 33rd case. A second generation patient to 26th case. In Patient
65 6 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Related to 31st case. A second generation patient to 26th case. In Patient
66 6 March 2020 61  Malaysia Related to 37th case. A second generation patient to 26th case. In Patient
67 6 March 2020 33  Malaysia Related to 37th case. A second generation patient to 26th case. In Patient
68 6 March 2020 36  Malaysia In Patient
69 6 March 2020 32  Malaysia In Patient
70 6 March 2020 51  Malaysia In Patient
71 6 March 2020 56  Malaysia In Patient
72 6 March 2020 44  Malaysia In Patient
73 6 March 2020 53  Malaysia In Patient
74 6 March 2020 35  Malaysia In Patient
75 6 March 2020 20  Malaysia In Patient
76 6 March 2020 24  Malaysia In Patient
77 6 March 2020 57  Malaysia In Patient
78 6 March 2020 11 March 2020 47  Malaysia Travelled to Indonesia for seven days starting 13 February. Developed symptoms on 19 February. Discharged
79 6 March 2020 32  Malaysia In Patient
80 6 March 2020 36  Malaysia In Patient
81 6 March 2020 51  Malaysia In Patient
82 6 March 2020 53  Malaysia In Patient
83 6 March 2020 53  Malaysia Part of cluster of cases linked to Case 33 but how she is linked is not disclosed. However, we know this is a second generation case, i.e. had close contact with another person who had contact with Case 33. In Patient
84 7 March 2020 NA  Malaysia A third generation patient after 26th and 33rd case. In Patient
85 7 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Related to 33rd case. A second generation patient to 26th case. In Patient
86 7 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Related to 33rd case. A second generation patient to 26th case. In Patient
87 7 March 2020 9 March 2020 68  Malaysia Related to 33rd case. A second generation patient to 26th case. Discharged
88 7 March 2020 NA  Malaysia A third generation patient after 26th and 33rd case. In Patient
89 7 March 2020 NA  Malaysia A third generation patient after 26th and 33rd case. In Patient
90 7 March 2020 NA  Malaysia A third generation patient after 26th and 33rd case. In Patient
91 7 March 2020 NA  Malaysia A third generation patient after 26th and 33rd case. In Patient
92 7 March 2020 NA  Malaysia A third generation patient after 26th and 33rd case. In Patient
93 7 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Related to 33rd case. A second generation patient to 26th case. In Patient
94 8 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Related to 26th case. In Patient
95 8 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Related to 26th case. In Patient
96 8 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Related to 26th case. In Patient
97 8 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Related to 26th case. In Patient
98 8 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Related to 26th case. In Patient
99 8 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Related to 26th case. In Patient
100 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
101 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Travelled to Iran with his business partner from 20–27 February. Tested on 5 March and diagnosed with the virus on 8 March. In Patient
102 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
103 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
104 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
105 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
106 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
107 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
108 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
109 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
110 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
111 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
112 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
113 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
114 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
115 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
116 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
117 9 March 2020 NA  Malaysia In Patient
118 10 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Part of cluster of cases linked to Case 33 but how they are linked is not disclosed. In Patient
119 10 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Part of cluster of cases linked to Case 33 but how they are linked is not disclosed. In Patient
120 10 March 2020 NA  Malaysia Part of cluster of cases linked to Case 33 but how they are linked is not disclosed. In Patient
Details of the confirmed death cases in Malaysia
Case Number Date of Death Nationality Gender Age Hospitalised Location Patient Data Source
1 178 17 March 2020  Malaysia Male 34 Permai Hospital Went to the religious gathering event held in Sri Petaling, Kuala Lumpur. On 5 March 2020, he started to show symptoms of fever. [89]
2 358 17 March 2020  Malaysia Male 60 Sarawak General Hospital Had chronic illness. He showed symptoms of fever, coughing and shortness of breath on 7 March 2020.
3 152 20 March 2020  Malaysia Male 58 Tawau Hospital Part of the religious gathering cluster. Hospitalised on 9 March 2020 when he showed severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) symptoms.
4 238 21 March 2020  Malaysia Male 50 Malacca General Hospital Part of the religious gathering cluster. Hospitalised on 12 March 2020 when he showed SARI symptoms.
5 1031 18 March 2020  Malaysia Female 79 Borneo Medical Centre Hospitalised after experiencing fever and coughing for five days. Had contact with two other positive cases, her son and daughter. [31]
6 1032 21 March 2020  Malaysia Female 40 Sarawak General Hospital Hospitalised since 7 March 2020 after she showed symptoms of fever and coughing.
7 290 21 March 2020  Malaysia Male 57 Kuala Lumpur Hospital Had a travel history to Vietnam and had contact with a positive case from the religious gathering cluster.
8 781 21 March 2020  Malaysia Male 69 Raja Perempuan Zainab II Hospital Part of the religious gathering cluster. Hospitalised on 16 March 2020 when he showed fever symptom since 12 March 2020.
9 890 22 March 2020  Malaysia Male 48 Tuanku Fauziah Hospital This is the first medical team death. He was a medical doctor in the Ministry of Health who had a travel history to Turkey. He experienced SARI symptoms and given ventilator when his situation deteriorated on 19 March 2020.
10 259 22 March 2020  Malaysia Male 74 Penang General Hospital Part of the religious gathering cluster. Hospitalised on 13 March 2020 when he showed symptoms since 8 March 2020.
11 1070 22 March 2020  Malaysia Male 70 Canselor Tuanku Muhriz UKM Hospital Had chronic illness and a travel history to Indonesia. Hospitalised on 18 March 2020. [32]
12 1114 23 March 2020  Malaysia Male 70 Enche' Besar Hajjah Khalsom Hospital Part of the religious gathering cluster.
13 1006 23 March 2020  Malaysia Male 49 Sarawak General Hospital Son to case number 1031 (fifth death case).
14 595 23 March 2020  Malaysia Female 51 Miri Hospital Close contact of a positive case from the religious gathering cluster.
15 1519 24 March 2020  Malaysia Male 71 Sultanah Fatimah Specialist Hospital Believed to have had close contact with a patient from the religious gathering cluster. Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 18 March 2020. [33]
16 1334 24 March 2020  Malaysia Male 75 Kuala Lumpur Hospital Had chronic illness. [34]
17 1251 25 March 2020  Malaysia Male 66 Sultanah Fatimah Specialist Hospital Believed to have had contact with a positive case. Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 20 March 2020.
18 1625 23 March 2020  Malaysia Male 56 Sultan Ismail Hospital Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 20 March 2020.
19 1246 25 March 2020  Malaysia Female 68 Sultanah Nora Ismail Hospital Hospitalised on 19 March 2020.
20 780 25 March 2020  Malaysia Male 76 Sultan Ismail Petra Hospital Part of the religious gathering cluster. Hospitalised on 18 March 2020. [35]
21 1588 26 March 2020  Malaysia Male 63 Sultanah Bahiyah Hospital Part of the religious gathering cluster. Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 23 March 2020.
22 1797 23 March 2020  Malaysia Male 48 Enche' Besar Hajjah Khalsom Hospital Part of the religious gathering cluster. Had chronic illness.
23 1840 25 March 2020  Malaysia Male 62 Raja Permaisuri Bainun Hospital Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 23 March 2020.
24 1056 26 March 2020  Malaysia Male 35 Kuala Lumpur Hospital Had a travel history to Indonesia. Hospitalised on 18 March 2020. [36]
25 2032 26 March 2020  Malaysia Male 83 Raja Permaisuri Bainun Hospital Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 25 March 2020.
26 1321 27 March 2020  Malaysia Male 53 Sungai Buloh Hospital Close contact of a positive case. Hospitalised on 22 March 2020.
27 2162 28 March 2020  Malaysia Male 61 Sultanah Fatimah Specialist Hospital Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 24 March 2020. [37]
28 2321 28 March 2020  Malaysia Female 91 University Malaya Medical Centre Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 26 March 2020. [38]
29 2123 28 March 2020  Malaysia Female 64 Tuanku Ja'afar Hospital Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 25 March 2020.
30 2322 28 March 2020  Malaysia Male 76 University Malaya Medical Centre Had chronic illness.
31 2323 28 March 2020  Malaysia Male 27 Raja Permaisuri Bainun Hospital Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 27 March 2020.
32 1239 28 March 2020  Malaysia Male 50 Enche' Besar Hajjah Khalsom Hospital Part of the religious gathering cluster. Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 22 March 2020.
33 1249 28 March 2020  Malaysia Male 37 Permai Hospital Had a travel history to India. Hospitalised on 21 March 2020.
34 787 29 March 2020  Malaysia Male 77 Kuala Lumpur Hospital Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 18 March 2020.
35 1952 29 March 2020  Malaysia Female 57 Sungai Buloh Hospital Had chronic illness and a travel history to Indonesia. [39]
36 1941 30 March 2020  Malaysia Male 47 Sarawak General Hospital Hospitalised on 23 March 2020.
37 2471 30 March 2020  Malaysia Female 46 Miri Hospital Had chronic illness.
38 2269 30 March 2020  Malaysia Female 48 Tuanku Ja'afar Hospital Close contact of a positive case. Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 25 March 2020. [40]
39 2626 27 March 2020  Malaysia Male 69 None Had chronic illness and a travel history to Saudi Arabia. Passed away at home and body was brought to the Kuala Lumpur Hospital.
40 2627 26 March 2020  Malaysia Male 69 Enche' Besar Hajjah Khalsom Hospital Had chronic illness.
41 1275 31 March 2020  Indonesia Male 40 Sarawak General Hospital Hospitalised on 20 March 2020.
42 2628 31 March 2020  Malaysia Male 81 University Malaya Medical Centre Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 27 March 2020.
43 2629 30 March 2020  Malaysia Male 73 Tengku Ampuan Rahimah Hospital Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 29 March 2020.
44 193 31 March 2020  Malaysia Female 80 Kuala Lumpur Hospital Close contact of a positive case. Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 13 March 2020. [41]
45 1053 31 March 2020  Malaysia Male 62 Kuala Lumpur Hospital Close contact of a positive case. Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 17 March 2020.
46 2909 31 March 2020  Malaysia Male 37 Sultanah Aminah Hospital Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 28 March 2020. [21]
47 2910 29 March 2020  Malaysia Male 78 Sultanah Fatimah Specialist Hospital Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 17 March 2020.
48 2572 2 April 2020  Malaysia Male 85 Enche' Besar Hajjah Khalsom Hospital Had chronic illness. Hospitalised on 29 March 2020.
49 1273 1 April 2020  Malaysia Male 61 Sarawak General Hospital Close contact of a positive case. Hospitalised on 20 March 2020.
50 1767 2 April 2020  Malaysia Male 69 Tuanku Ja'afar Hospital Hospitalised on 22 March 2020.

Case-related events

January 2020

Eight Chinese nationals were quarantined at a hotel in Johor Bahru on 24 January after coming into contact with an infected person in neighbouring Singapore.[17] Despite early reports of them testing negative for the virus,[90] three of them were confirmed to be infected on 25 January and subsequently quarantined at the Sungai Buloh Hospital in Selangor.[55][56] The Malaysian health ministry published guidelines on the virus and established designated hospitals in each of Malaysia's states to manage any positive cases.[91] The Malaysian public were reminded by local authorities to take precautionary measures in the wake of the virus threat with those travelling to China have been advised to stay away from animal farms and markets in the country and to not eat raw or semi-cooked meats.[92] Following several earlier suspected cases in Sabah's capital of Kota Kinabalu, all direct flights between the state with China were stopped indefinitely.[93][94]

On 24 January, a two-year-old child who was suspected to have been infected was detained along with their parents. The parents refused quarantine and were detained the next day by police at Senai International Airport before returning to China.[95] The patient including others who refused quarantine were subsequently placed under close monitoring by the local Health Ministry.[96] On 26 January, a fourth case of the virus, unconnected to previous cases, was detected.[97] A suspected case was also detected in the state of Kedah's island of Langkawi involving two female Chinese nationals with both victims quarantined at the Sultanah Maliha Hospital; one later confirmed positive on 29 January.[98][99][100][101] With the increasing number of cases reported in neighbouring Thailand, both the state of Kedah and Penang tightened their borders by conducting stringent checks at its international entry points.[102] A Chinese female national in Bintulu of Sarawak also suspected of having contracted the virus led to the state tightening its border and postponing direct flights to Hainan, despite a recently signed memorandum of understanding (MoU) establishing direct flights with Sarawak.[100][103][104][105]

Of the total of 25 Chinese nationals in Sabah earlier suspected of having contracted the virus, most of them tested negative as of 28 January although one of them later tested positive for the virus upon reaching China.[106][107] Another four suspected cases were recorded in Sarawak on 29 January; five in Kuching and one each in Sibu and Miri.[108] Of the total eight suspected cases in the state, six have tested negative.[109] Within the same day, three additional positive cases were confirmed in West Malaysia, involving a four-year-old child quarantined at the Sultanah Maliha Hospital in Kedah, a 52-year-old man at Sultanah Aminah Hospital in Johor and a woman at Sungai Buloh Hospital in Selangor.[101] An eighth case was reported at the Permai Hospital in Johor on the next day.[110]

February 2020

On 4 February, Malaysia announced two new cases, including a 41-year-old local male, which was the first case involving a Malaysian. The case patient had a recent trip to Singapore and is quarantined in Sungai Buloh Hospital. The other case involved a 63-year-old male from China.[111] On the same day, the child quarantined at the Sultanah Maliha Hospital had made a full recovery, was discharged, and allowed to return to China.[112] On 5 February, two of 107 Malaysians and non-Malaysian family relatives brought back from Wuhan by the Malaysian government tested positive and were quarantined at Tuanku Ja'afar Hospital in Seremban of Negeri Sembilan. They were a 45-year-old man and his nine-year-old son, both Malaysians, bringing the total to 12.[113] The younger sister of the 41-year-old Malaysian reported positive of the virus on 4 February, a 40-year-old Malaysian had also been confirmed infected with the virus on 6 February, making her the first patient who acquired the virus through local transmission in Malaysia, and warded at Sultanah Bahiyah Hospital in Alor Setar. A positive case involving a 32-year-old woman from Wuhan was reported on the same day. The woman came to Malaysia on 25 January and referred to Kuala Lumpur Hospital.[114] Another woman from Wuhan was confirmed positive of the virus on the next day, and was quarantined in Hospital Permai with her husband, who was asymptomatic. The 59-year-old woman came from Malaysia from Singapore on 21 January with three of her relatives.[115]

On 8 February, Malaysia reported an another case involving a Wuhan tourist. The case patient is a 67-year-old woman who had indirect relations with another case patient reported positive on 6 February and quarantined at Kuala Lumpur Hospital.[116] On the same day, Malaysia reported that its fourth case patient, who was warded at Permai Hospital had acquired a full recovery.[117] A total of 11 new patients were also admitted to hospitals within the day for investigation of suspected infection in the state of Sarawak after they were reported to show symptoms; they comprised nine in Sibu Hospital, one in Miri Hospital and one in Sarawak General Hospital of Kuching. A hotline was subsequently set up by the Sarawak state government on the virus outbreak.[118] On 9 February, the mother-in-law of the ninth case, a 65-year-old local became the 17th reported case.[119] Meanwhile, Malaysia reported its third full recovery involving its tenth case patient on the same day.[120] On 10 February, Malaysia reported its 18th case,[121][122] a 31-year-old local who worked in Macau until 1 February. The same day, the Sarawak Disaster Management Committee began to impose a prohibition to neighbouring Singaporeans due to the major increase of positive cases in the neighbouring country.[123]

Temporary travel restrictions into Malaysia on 13 February 2020, particularly to the states of Sabah and Sarawak as released by Malaysia Airlines.

On 13 February, Malaysia reported its 19th case, which is a 39-year-old woman from Wuhan and daughter of the 16th case patient, warded at Kuala Lumpur Hospital.[124][125] On 15 February, Malaysia reported two more cases, which are a 27-year-old businessman from Guangzhou and a 32-year-old woman who is from China but resides in Malaysia. The man is warded at Sultanah Bahiyah Hospital.[126] A 22nd case subsequently reported within the same day involving an elderly woman from the United States who was among hundreds of passengers who disembarked from the MS Westerdam cruise ship in Cambodia and flew to Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia.[127] The woman is warded at the Sungai Buloh Hospital of Selangor.[128] Meanwhile, the remaining 143 passengers including a further six passengers from the same flight with the woman had been declared free from the virus and allowed to return into their respective countries.[129][130]

The Holland America Line and Cambodian health ministry requested Malaysia to re-test the US citizen to ensure the accuracy of its findings.[131][132] This second check-up conducted by the Malaysian health ministry on the woman turned out positive for the virus.[133][134] Following this second test confirmation, the Malaysian authorities announced the remaining passengers of the cruise ships would not be allowed to enter the country despite several flights being chartered by Holland America Line with Malaysia Airlines. Their departure has not been possible from Cambodia, as this country did not have any direct flights to Europe and the United States.[135] The woman however discharged soon after she was cleared from the virus after another more check-up.[80] This casts doubt from the Cambodian government as well from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the United States over the diagnosis conducted by Malaysia despite the Cambodian government still rejected any further speculations that there were already diplomatic tension between Cambodia and Malaysia on the issue.[136][137] The Health Ministry of Malaysia later released a statement of explanation that the American female patient is only recently recovering after 72 hours of treatment.[138]

On 16 February, the 15th infected patient involving a Chinese female national had fully recovered, becoming the 8th patient cured from the virus in Malaysia.[74] The following day, the first infected Malaysian also reportedly recovered, becoming the 9th cured.[63] Another two recovered on 20 February, with only five remained warded.[139] By 26 February 20 of the total 22 positive coronavirus patients have been discharged from hospital.[79] The same day, a Malaysian female national hospital worker in Sabah's Kudat District suspected of having contracted the virus were quarantined when she developed symptoms after returning from South Korea.[140] Although she was later declared free from the virus,[141] the Malaysian government had begun to restrict travel from South Korea as precaution measures especially with the large positive reported cases within the country.[142] The following day, another two recovered while a new case involving a Malaysian female national who recently returned from Japan were recorded.[75][81][82] Further two cases involving foreign nationals living in Malaysia; a Japanese female national who works in the capital city of Kuala Lumpur and an Italian male married to a Malaysian spouse were recorded on 28 February.[83][84]

Kuala Lumpur religious event

In March 2020, several Southeast Asian countries experienced a significant rise in cases following a Tablighi jamaat event held at Jamek Mosque in Sri Petaling, Kuala Lumpur, where many people are believed to have been infected.[143] The four day event, from 27 February to 1 March, had approximately 16,000 attendees, including about 1,500 from outside Malaysia.[144] Attendees shared food, sat close together, and held hands at the event. According to guests, the leaders of the event did not talk about COVID-19 precautions, but most attendees washed their hands during the event.[143] Malaysian authorities were criticized for allowing the event to go forward.[143]

By 17 March, almost two thirds of the 673 cases confirmed in Malaysia were related to the event.[143][144] More than 620 people, including those from other countries, who attended the event have tested positive, making it the largest-known centre of transmission in South East Asia. Six countries have traced their cases back here – most of the 73 coronavirus cases in Brunei have been linked to the event, as well as 10 cases in Thailand, 5 in Singapore and 22 in Cambodia.[145][146]

March 2020

Four additional cases, all involving Malaysian nationals, were recorded on 1 March.[87][86] Seven more cases were reported by the Ministry of Health on 3 March.[147] Further 44 new infections were recorded in the early month of March which bringing the total confirmed cases to 99.[148] By 11 March, the Malaysian authorities began to track 5,000 of its citizens believed to have been exposed to the virus in a gathering at a Tablighi jamaat event in the capital city of Kuala Lumpur which being initiated following the first positive case in neighbouring Brunei with source of infection from Malaysia.[144][149] Many were later confirmed to carrying the virus with all of them have returned into their respective states which subsequently triggering a sporadic case of transmission within local community.[144][150][151][152] This raise the total confirmed cases from 158 by 12 March,[153] to 197 by 13 March.[154] The correct figures of the gathering participants were later revised by the country Health Ministry from 5,000 to 14,500 which fuelled further estimation that there could be more positive cases to be discovered.[155] From the total of 14,500, 41 of them have been tested positive which increasing the total confirmed cases to 238.[156][157][158] By 15 March 190 new cases, the highest daily cases since the outbreak, has been identified, increasing the confirmed cases to 428.[159] This lead the country Health Ministry stating that Malaysia is currently in late containment stage and special meeting will be held to discuss the next course of action.[160]

We have a slight chance of deciding the COVID-19 infection network. Help the Ministry of Health (MOH) with playing your part, as each individual is responsible for taking every step, in the best interests of his or her family. I appeal to all Malaysians, please take this movement control order seriously. Stay home and don't go out. If not, we might face the third wave of the virus, which in turn will be as big as a tsunami, moreover, if we have an unconscious attitude.

—Malaysia Health Director Noor Hisham message to every Malaysians with the rising number of positive cases reported within the country, 18 March 2020.[161][162][163]

Only take-away and delivery is allowed during the movement control order as seen in this notice released by Malaysia's restaurant outlet of Secret Recipe on 18 March 2020.

On 16 March, the total confirmed cases had increased to over 553 cases and later that evening, Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin held a live nationwide telecast to inform the decision of the federal government to implement the Movement Control Order.[11][12][164][165] On 17 March, Malaysia reported its first two deaths from the coronavirus, a 60-year-old priest from Emmanuel Baptist Church in Kuching, Sarawak and a 34-year-old participant of the Muslim religious gathering in Sri Petaling from Johor Bahru, Johor.[166] A total of 673 cases were reported by 17 March,[167] and an additional 117 new cases were diagnosed on 18 March, with 11 discharged, bringing the cumulative statistic for positive and recovered cases to 790 and 60 respectively.[168] On 19 March, Health Director Noor Hisham once again urged people to stay home, saying that Malaysia has a small chance of blocking the rapid spread of coronavirus disease as compared to the current situation facing by Italy; telling that if it misses the third wave of infection, the situation will be out of control similar to what happened in Italy. It is also very likely that the government will extend the "movement restriction order" for another 14 days.[169] The Prime Minister also has similarly appeal to every Malaysians to adhere the control order to prevent further infections within the country.[170]

By 20 March, a total of 1,030 confirmed cases have been reported with another death involving one of the participant of the religious gathering from Sabah; a 58-year-old man.[171][172] The same day, 15 medical staffs treating coronavirus patient in the country have become infected with one placed in intensive care unit (ICU).[173][174] On 21 March, another religious gathering participant, a 50-year-old man from Malacca has died with total infection cases rise to 1,183.[175][176][177] Another four deaths: a 79-year-old woman in Sarawak and her 40-year-old daughter were reported within the day along with a 57-year-old man who has a travel history to Vietnam before meeting one of the religious gathering participants where he was being hospitalised in Kuala Lumpur and another was a 69-year-old man gathering participant from Kelantan.[178][179][180] A total of six Malaysian police officers also have been infected by the virus while serving their duty.[181] Until 23 March, a total of 14 deaths have been recorded involving a 48-year-old doctor from Perlis who has a travel history to Turkey, a 74-year-old religious gathering participant from Penang and a 70-year-old surau chairman from Kuala Lumpur who has a travel history to Indonesia have died with total infection cases further rise to 1,518.[182][183][184] Until 25 March, a total of 72 Malaysia's health workers have been infected by the virus.[185] On 26 March, the Malaysian royal household confirmed that seven officers from the nation's National Palace had been confirmed positve, which caused Malaysia's head of state, Abdullah of Pahang and his spouse to be put into quarantine, although they themselves had undergone COVID-19 tests with negative results.[186]

On March 27, a 62-year-old patient was found to have committed suicide in Serdang Hospital, allegedly due to depression.[187][188] On March 29, Malaysia recorded its highest daily fatality cases with seven cases died due to the pandemic.[189] On the same day, the Director General also informed that the Tabligh cluster had reached the fifth generation.[190]

On March 31, the Health director-general Datuk Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah confirmed six new deaths, bringing the total death toll to 43. In addition, 140 new cases were reported, bringing the total number to 2,766.[191]

April 2020

On 1 April, Health director-general Datuk Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah confirmed that 108 coronavirus patients had recovered. Noor Hisham also confirmed 142 new cases, bringing the total number to 2,908.[192]

On 2 April, Dr Noor Hisham confirmed 208 new cases, taking the total number of the infect to 3,116. In addition, the Health Ministry confirmed that the total number coronavirus deaths was 50.[193]

Preventive measures by government

Movement Control Order

Temperature checkup in the capital city of Kuala Lumpur during movement control order.

Beginning from 15 March, Malaysia saw a significant jump in active cases. The Prime Minister of Malaysia held a live nationwide telecast on 16 March 2020 at 10:00PM (UTC+8) to announce the decision of the federal government in implementing the Movement Control Order. The order was to be in effect from 18 March until 31 March,[11][12] however was extended till 14 April by 25 March.[194] Based on the live addressing that evening, six restrictions have been imposed:

  1. The public is prohibited to mass gather or attend massive events including religious, sports, social and cultural activities. All worshiping locations and business premises should be closed except for supermarkets, public markets, grocery stores and convenience stores that sells everyday necessities. For Muslims, all religious activities in mosques including Friday prayers are adjourned in line with decision made on 15 March 2020 by the Special Muzakarah Committee Meeting of the National Fatwa Council.[195]
  2. Malaysians returning from abroad are required to undergo health check and self-quarantine for 14 days.[195]
  3. Tourists and foreign visitors are restricted to enter the country.[195]
  4. Closure of all kindergartens, government and private schools, including daily schools, boarding schools, international schools, tahfiz centres and other primary, secondary and pre-university institutions.[195]
  5. Closure of all public and private higher education institution (IPTs) and skill training institutes.[195]
  6. Closure of all government and private premises except for essential services (water, electricity, energy, telecommunications, postal, transportation, irrigation, oil, gas, fuel, lubricants, broadcasting, finance, banking, health, pharmacy, fire, prison, port, airport, safety, defence, cleaning, retail and food supply).[195]

Epidemic prevention for immigration

Temporary Prohibition in Sabah
Prohibition dated 7 February 2020 in Sabah.
Temporary Prohibition in Sarawak
Prohibition dated 1 February 2020 in Sarawak.
Temporary Prohibition released by the State Secretary of the Government of Sabah and Sarawak Disaster Management Committee of the Government of Sarawak.

With the movement control order put in place since 18 March, all citizens have been prohibited from leaving the country with foreigners also prohibited from entering the country.[196]

Since the first wave of the virus was reported, thermal scanners were introduced at border points with the Malaysian health authorities placed on high alert.[197] After the ban on travellers from Hubei on 27 January, the Malaysian federal government extended its ban to the Chinese provinces of Jiangsu and Zhejiang on 9 February.[198] The state of Sabah expanded their travel restriction to all points of entry by air, sea or land starting 8 February, involving everyone except Sabahan citizens with recent travel history to mainland China within 14 days, while Sabahan citizens with such travel history must undergo a 14-day quarantine at home.[199] The state of Sarawak closed its borders to all Chinese visitors with immediate effect on 1 February, except for people with employment passes, student passes or long-term social visit passes. However, those visitors were required to undergo self-quarantine at home for 14 days.[200] With the increasing cases in South Korea, both Sabah and Sarawak government began to extended its travel restrictions into the country from 1 March.[201][202] On 4 March, Sarawak further added Italy and Iran into its travel restrictions list.[203]

On 5 March, Malaysia added seven regions towards its travel restriction list, which include Lombardy, Veneto and Emilia-Romagna in Italy; Hokkaido in Japan; and Tehran, Qom and Gilan in Iran.[204] By 10 March, Sabah also began to added Italy and Iran into its restrictions list.[205] On 11 March, Malaysia announced a full restriction on foreign nationals directly from Italy, Iran and South Korea starting from 13 March, while Malaysians from those countries will be quarantined for 14 days.[206] Following the 13 March Denmark lockdown, Malaysia has added the country into its travel ban list effective from 14 March.[207]

Overseas travel alert and quarantine arrangements

The following are warnings and quarantine arrangements for inbound and outbound travel:

Alert level Country Date of issue Cancellation date Note
Prohibit  China 9 February 2020 In force In response to the 2020 coronavirus pandemic in Mainland China, the government announced that travellers from the three Chinese provinces of Hubei, Jiangsu and Zhejiang are banned with immediate effect from 9 February.[198]
Prohibit  Iran
 Italy
 South Korea
13 March 2020 In force In response to the 2020 coronavirus pandemic in Iran, Italy and South Korea, the government announced that all Malaysian citizens, permanent residents and people with long-term residence permits from that date must be self-quarantine at their homes for 14 days after returning from the three countries.[206]
Prohibit  Denmark 14 March 2020 In force In response to the 2020 coronavirus pandemic in Denmark and its recent lockdown, the government announced a travel ban to the country.[207]
Prohibit All countries 18 March 2020 In force With the movement control order put in place since 18 March, all citizens have been prohibited from leaving the country with foreigners also prohibited from entering the country.[196]

Testing and treatment centre

A voluntary Malaysia's fire brigade during disinfection works in Machang Bubok Wet Market, Seberang Perai, 21 March 2020.

On 5 January, the National Crisis Preparedness and Response Centre (CPRC) under the Ministry of Health Malaysia started to operate.[208] There are 57 hospitals that provide screening services for coronavirus,[208] while among them, 26 government hospitals are responsible for the confirmation of coronavirus and the suspected patients.[209][210]

With the rapid increase of infections, a further total of 409 sites across the country have been gazetted by the federal government as quarantine zones for coronavirus patients comprising public universities, community colleges, technical institutes, former National Service (PLKN) camps, training centres, polytechnics and hotels owned by federal ministries, departments, agencies and statutory bodies.[211]

Repatriation of Malaysian non-main officials abroad

Record Form of Repatriation for Malaysian non-main officials abroad
Departure date Number of passengers Departure airport Arrival airport
4 February 2020 107[212] Wuhan – Tianhe KL – Sepang
26 February 2020 66[213] Wuhan – Tianhe KL – Sepang
21 March 2020 212[214] Tashkent – Islam Karimov KL – Sepang
22 March 2020 55 (comprising 46 Malaysians, eight Singaporeans and one Indonesian)[215] Tehran – Imam Khomeini KL – Sepang
30 March 2020 179 Malaysians[216] Amritsar, India[216] KL – Sepang
31 March 2020 144 Malaysians[216] Myanmar[216] KL – Sepang

The Malaysian government has made the repatriation of its citizens abroad a priority; beginning with the first repatriations from China.[217] During the first repatriation, two persons were found to be infected with the virus and were subsequently quarantined and treated in the country until they have fully recovered.[65][218]

On 21 March, a total of 212 Malaysians arrived from Uzbekistan through a flight sponsored by the Uzbekistan government which is also being used to repatriated Uzbek citizens in Malaysia.[214] On that same day, 372 Malaysians departed Tamil Nadu on two chartered flights. On 22 March, it was reported that the Malaysian government was waiting for the Indian government's permission to organise six more flights to evacuate Malaysians still in India.[219]

On 31 March, the Defence Minister Datuk Seri Ismail Sabri Yaakob announced that all Malaysians returning from overseas would have to undergo a compulsory two-week quarantine at designated quarantine centers around the country.[220] That same day, Deputy Foreign Minister Kamaruddin Jaffar confirmed that 4,374 Malaysians were stranded abroad due to the travel restrictions and delays created by the global coronavius pandemic. This figure only consists of Malaysians who had bought return tickets but were unable to return due to travel restrictions. According to Kamaruddin, 2,156 Malaysians are stranded in India, 680 in Indonesia, 337 in Thailand, 226 in Australia, 153 in New Zealand, 128 in Pakistan, and 121 in Saudi Arabia.[216]

Bans on mass gathering events

Immediately after the spikes of the cases which related to the Sri Petaling Tabligh event, prime minister Muhyiddin Yassin announces that all events that involving mass gathering in any genre including international, religious, sports, meetups and social must be cancelled or postponed until 30 April 2020.[221][222] However, the end date for the ban on mass gathering events are subject to revision depending on the situation of the outbreak.[223] In addition, Registrar of Societies (RoS) bans all parties registered with RoS from organising any meeting and activities until 30 June 2020.[224]

Suspension of extracurricular activity in schools

The Ministry of Education of Malaysia announces that all extracurricular activity in schools will be suspended starting from March 2020 until further notice.[225][226]

Economic stimulus plan

On 27 March, Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin launched an economic stimulus package known as the "caring package" worth RM250 billion. Of these, RM128 billion was used to protect the welfare of the people and RM100 billion to support businesses, including small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

The government also announced a RM600 million allocation on March 23 to the Ministry of Health for the purchase of equipment and to hire contract personnel, especially nurses. It has also announced that contributors of the Employees Provident Fund can withdraw up to RM500 per month for 12 months.[227]

An allocation of RM130 million has also been announced and will be distributed equally to all states to help overcome the Covid-19 pandemic.[228] The details of the plan are:

  1. Budget of RM500 million to the Ministry of Health to enhance the health and resources of the ministry.
  2. The government raises special allowances for healthcare workers from RM400 to RM600 a month from April 1 until the end of the pandemic.
  3. Additional special allowance of RM200 per month for frontliner for police, immigration, Customs Department, Malaysian Civil Defence Force and RELA Corps personels.
  4. Aid of RM1,600 to households earning less than RM4,000, with RM1,000 paid in April and RM600 in May.
  5. National Concerns fund with RM10 billion worth of cash payments will be provided to groups B40 and M40, including private workers, farmers and fishermen. These include RM1,600 to four million households earning RM4,000 and below; RM1,000 for households earning RM4,000 above; RM800 for Malaysians aged 21 and over who earn RM2,000 and below; RM500 for Malaysians aged 21 and over earns between RM2,000 and RM4,000.
  6. RM200 of one-time assistance to affected higher education institution students.
  7. Free internet from April onwards until the end of the MCO.
  8. The joint government of TNB will increase the allocation of RM530 million for a discount of between 15% and 50% for electricity usage up to 600 kW per month for six months from the April bill.
  9. Exemption of rent for Program Perumahan Rakyat and public housing for six months.
  10. Insurance and takaful companies set aside RM8 million to cover COVID-19 inspection costs up to RM300 per policyholder.
  11. Government to provide a payment of RM500 to approximately 120,000 e-hailing drivers starting April 1.
  12. The Government and Bank Negara Malaysia will set aside an additional allocation of RM4.5 billion for SMEs and micro-entrepreneurs which will consist of five initiatives.
  13. One-off RM500 aid for 120,000 e-hailing drivers nationwide with an allocation of RM60 million. This is in addition to the one-time assistance announced for taxi drivers announced in the previous stimulus package.
  14. The government will pay the salaries incurred by contractors involved in the service sector, such as cleaning services and food supplies cooked at government agencies.
  15. The government will introduce a subsidy of RM600 a month for three months for employers with a 50% reduction since Jan 1, for workers with less than RM4,000 in salaries.
  16. The government will continue all projects allocated in the 2020 Budget, including ECRL, MRT2 and the National Sustainability and Sustainability Plan (NFCP) in line with its focus on ensuring sustainable economic development.
  17. Human Resources Development Fund (HRDF) is tax-exempted for all sectors for six months beginning April 2020.
  18. Federal government premises such as school cafeteria, nursery, cafeteria and convenience store are exempt from rent for six months.
  19. Government pensioners to receive RM500 cash assistance.

Implications

Economy, trade and tourism

I think it's very contained right now and there's ... no cause for panic at all, but we cannot be complacent about this and we'll continue to be on serious alert.

—Malaysia Health Minister Dzulkefly Ahmad during conversation with CNBC on the situation of the outbreak in Malaysia, 19 February 2020.[229]

Stocks on Malaysia's stock exchange of Bursa Malaysia tumbled during the outbreak as investors sold securities due to the expected economic impact caused by the virus,[230] which along with other emerging stock markets are predicted to remain until June 2020.[231] With China as Malaysia's largest trading partner, the country's economy was directly impacted and economic experts have warned the prolonged virus outbreak could hit the country gross domestic product (GDP) hard.[232] Malaysia which also largely relied on tourism and being among the top destinations for Chinese tourists, suffered a stark decline of tourist arrival from Mainland China due to the outbreak with the tourism industry hit hardest; costing around RM3.37 billion losses until March.[233][234] Malaysian states highly dependent on tourism sectors and being the point for Mainland Chinese visitors such as Johor,[235] Malacca,[236] Penang,[237] and Sabah[238] were among the heaviest affected with hotel bookings and food stalls have reported large loss in businesses.[239][240] These subsequently forced the states to shift their focus to the Southeast Asian market due to the decline of Mainland Chinese tourists.[241][242] Regardless the large losses incurred by tourism businesses, a number of Malaysians have voiced their concerns over the spread of the virus and urging a ban on travellers from China to the country with some 149,000 in support of the call.[243][244] Aberdeen Standard Investments of Malaysia also predicted the country currency of Malaysian ringgit (MYR) to weaken further throughout the local and worldwide outbreak which exacerbate further by instable local political scene in the country.[245]

Panic buying and essential item shortages

Panic buying in one of the AEON malls in the country.
The toilet paper section, cleared of stock.
The aftermath of panic buying as seen in a Malaysian supermarket on 18 March 2020.
Face masks out of stock notice in a Watsons outlet within Malaysia's capital of Kuala Lumpur.

The increase in cases and public awareness on the threat posed by the virus has exacerbated panic buying of surgical masks and hand sanitisers which were selling like hot cakes within a short period. Malaysian cities, such as Johor Bahru and Kota Kinabalu, have reported shortages on surgical masks,[246] while a cleaning company in Shah Alam reported a higher demand for hand sanitisers due to the outbreak.[247] There were reports that some pharmacies and traders have been selling masks with higher prices than the controlled price set by the Domestic Trade and Consumer Affairs Ministry of Malaysia which can lead to fines of up to RM10,000 (US$2,387).[248][249] This also includes reports of some people being scammed by unscrupulous individuals taking advantage of the pandemic situation.[250][251] Despite the increasing shortages of masks in the country with both pharmacies and suppliers struggling to meet the increasing demands,[252][253] the federal government has assured the supply of masks to be replenished with a total of 10 million masks to enter Malaysian markets in the nearest time.[254][255] With the rapid spread of the virus infections into several more states such as Penang and Sabah in the country,[256][257] panic buying has seen an increase nationwide with people began to packing excessive essential items.[258] This causing some of the major supermarket operators in the country to continuously assured the public that there is adequate supply of essentials and urging most people to not engage in panic buying despite the recently announced move by the federal government to impose movement control within the country.[259] The federal government also in the consideration to ban face masks exports as a result of the increasing mask shortages with the Domestic Trade and Consumer Affairs Ministry to raise the increasing shortages issues of surgical masks and hand sanitisers to the Malaysian Cabinet.[260][261] On 18 March, the enforcement to ban face masks export was gazetted under the Control of Supplies (Prohibition on Export) – (Amendment) Regulations 2020 covering four type of face masks.[262] Apart from enacting law banning face masks exports to meet the struggling domestic public demands, the federal government announced that it will import 10 million face masks from China by stages to increase nationwide supply with the importation of face masks from other countries also being allowed.[263][264][265]

Sporting and other events

The pandemic outbreak has forced the cancellations and postponements of many events in the country; including both local and international.[266] All sports and co-curricular activities in schools were postponed with immediate effects as announced by the country Ministry of Education.[225] Major Anglican and Catholic Masses in West Malaysia as well as in Sabah and Sarawak were also postponed,[267] while annual cultural events in Sabah such as the Kaamatan (Kadazan-Dusun festival) and Kalimaran (Murut festival) have been cancelled.[268][269] Despite Muslim Friday sermon (except for the state of Perlis on 13 March)[270] are still not suspended due to the virus, the Yang-di Pertuan Agong of Malaysia has called for shorter sermon and every mosques in the country must provide forehead thermometer, hand sanitiser and face masks as part of the prevention measures.[271] A guidelines on Friday sermon has been released by the Religious Affairs Minister of Malaysia.[272] With the Malaysia national football team will play the 2022 World Cup qualifiers, the Malaysians planned to play a friendly game against Bahrain before facing the UAE and Vietnam. It was later announced that the friendly would not take part due to severe outbreak in Malaysia and, later, Bahrain.[273] Further sporting events such as golf's Maybank Championship and other local tournament were immediately called off while other sporting events such as badminton's Malaysia Open, football's M-League, hockey's Azlan Shah Cup, squash's Asian Team Championship and Malaysian Schools Sports Council events were either cancelled or postponed.[274][275][276]

Funds and aid on the pandemic

Exchange of aid between China and Malaysia

January–February aid to China

Malaysian aid organisation #OpsHarapan aimed to collect 10,000 N95 face masks for its relief efforts to Wuhan.[277] A total of 18 million pieces of medical gloves were donated by Malaysia to assist China in their struggle against the virus.[278][279][280] The Malaysia's state Government of Sabah has raised RM2 million for the "Wuhan Fund" which will be channelled to China as a sign of solidarity with the country during the outbreak.[281] The state government fund's earlier target was RM1 million although the amount received exceeded the initial target when a local philanthropist contributed RM40,000 (US$9,548).[282][283] The fundraising was organised in a joint event called "We Love, We Care" by the Sabah government and Chinese associations.[284] A group of musicians in Malaysia also published a song to support China in their struggle against the virus titled "You Are Not Alone" which was featured in a show in Malaysia's capital of Kuala Lumpur.[285]

March aid to Malaysia

Following the Malaysian government's move to impose the Movement Control Order as a late-stage containment, the Chinese government through its ambassador in Malaysia has stated that they are committed to aid by supplying disinfectants, face masks, PCR testing kits, sanitisers and ventilators to help the latter contain the further spread of the virus.[286][287] The first medical supplies were sent to Sungai Buloh Hospital on 19 March.[288] A further 100,000 face masks were sent by the President of China-Asia Economic Development Association to Malaysia.[289] Along the same day, Chinese Alibaba Group founder Jack Ma further announced that through his foundation, a total of 2 million masks, 150,000 test kits, 20,000 protective suits and 20,000 face shields will be sent to four Southeast Asian countries including Malaysia to aid these nations in their struggle against the virus.[290] A further total of 1,000 face masks, 20,000 medical masks, 100 protective clothing and 100 goggles were contributed by China specifically for the Malaysian police forces.[291] China's Consulate-General in Kota Kinabalu also has announced that medical aid to be dispatched to Sabah to aid their struggle against the virus and reciprocate the people's of Sabah recent assistance to Mainland China during the outbreak.[292][293]

Aid from other countries

The Malaysian government was also given aid from United Arab Emirates, which included 600,000 face masks, 200 ventilators, about 100,000 test kits and 50,000 protective clothings.[294]

Local pandemic fund within Malaysia

Following the severely strained healthcare system due to the increasing number of infections by the virus, Mercy Malaysia launched the "Covid-19 Pandemic Fund" to supporting medical services and the essential needs of marginalised groups within the country.[295] The Malaysian Red Crescent Society also launched the #responsMALAYSIA (Malaysia's Response) initiative to support frontliners.[296]

Various Malaysian states have launched their own stimulus packages and announced immediate financial aid in the form of rental waivers and deferment of student loan repayments to help their citizens to cope throughout the virus outbreak with the federal government of Malaysia also announced it will disburse a total of RM130 million equally among Malaysia's 13 states to help small traders, the infected victims and front-line staff including those in the healthcare sector.[297]

In February, Malaysia's home improvement retailer MR DIY distributed a total of 3.5 million free face masks nationwide to help curb the spread of the virus.[298] Further in March, Coway Malaysia donated a total of 100,000 pieces of surgical face masks to PDRM in an effort to help safeguard police personnel who are on the frontlines during the global pandemic.[299]

Various Malaysian banks such as Affin Bank, Agrobank, Alliance Bank, AmBank, Bank Islam Malaysia, Bank Muamalat Malaysia, Bank Rakyat, Bank Simpanan Nasional, CIMB, Hong Leong Bank, HSBC Bank Malaysia, Maybank, MBSB Bank, OCBC Bank, Public Bank Berhad, RHB Bank and SME Bank has offered measures including financial assistance for its customers amidst the virus crisis.[300][301]

Local broadcasting and telecommunications companies aid

To keep the Malaysian public entertained during the movement control order period, both Malaysia's pay television and internet services of Unifi offers free access to all Unifi TV channels while its mobile prepaid of Unifi Mobile offers unlimited data.[302][303] Astro also offers free access to all of its paid movie channels through both basic Astro and Astro GO mobile application.[304]

Government relief assistance

On 27 March, Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin launched the Government's RM250 billion Prihatin stimulus package to help people, businesses and the economy to weather the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic.[305] The Prihatin stimulus package consists of RM128 billion for welfare assistance, RM100 billion to support small and medium businesses, RM2 billion to strengthen the country's economy, and a RM20 billion stimulus package that was previously announced by the Government.[306] The regional economist Brian Tan from Barclays, said that the central bank would cut interest rates to 1%.[307]

Controversies

Following the Tablighi Jamaat gathering at a Sri Petaling mosque, it had since then been identified as a vector point for the Covid-19 virus. The Malaysian Government, under political turmoil, and authorities were criticised for not doing anything to prevent the outbreak.[308]

Chinese family refuses to quarantine

Controversy related to insufficient facemasks and pricing

Controversy related to quarantine regulations in University of Malaya

Student volunteers at University of Malaya claim they are designed to deal with the "quarantine" of students returning from China in the new semester.[309]

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