Wiki.RIP

2020 coronavirus pandemic in France

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

2020 coronavirus pandemic in France
COVID-19 outbreak France per capita cases map.svg
Confirmed cases per million inhabitants by region
COVID-19 Outbreak Hospitalized in France 13 Regions & DomTom.svg
Regions of France with number of people currently hospitalised
  Hospitalised 1~9
  Hospitalised 10~99
  Hospitalised 100~499
  Hospitalised 500~999
  Hospitalised 1000~9999
  Hospitalized ≥10000
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationFrance
First outbreakWuhan, Hubei, China
Index caseBordeaux
Arrival date24 January 2020
(2 months, 1 week and 3 days)
Confirmed cases59,105[1]
Recovered12,427[2]
Deaths
5,387 (Total)
4,503 (Hospital)[1]
884 (EHPAD [fr])
Official website
Public Health France

The 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic was confirmed to have spread to France on 24 January 2020, when the first COVID-19 case in Europe and France was confirmed in Bordeaux. It involved a 48-year-old French citizen who arrived in France from China. Two more cases were confirmed by the end of the day; all of the individuals had recently returned from China.[3][4] A Chinese tourist was admitted to a hospital in Paris on 28 January and died on 14 February, marking the first death from COVID-19 outside of Asia.[5][6]

One key event in the spread of the disease across Metropolitan France as well as its overseas territories was the annual assembly of the Christian Open Door Church between 17 and 24 February in Mulhouse which was attended by about 2,500 people, at least half of whom are believed to have contracted the virus.[7][8] As of 31 March 2020, there have been 52,128 confirmed cases, 5,387 deaths within hospital and retirement homes and 7,132 recoveries in France.[1][9]

On 12 March, president of France Emmanuel Macron announced on public television that all schools and all universities would close from Monday 16 March until further notice. The next day, the prime minister Édouard Philippe banned gatherings of more than 100 people, not including public transportation. The following day, the prime minister ordered the closure of all nonessential public places, including restaurants, cafés, cinemas, and discothèques, effective at midnight.[10] On 16 March, President Macron announced a national lockdown for 15 days starting on 17 March midday. On 27 March, Prime Minister Édouard Philippe announced that the lockdown would be extended until 15 April.[11]

Timeline

COVID-19 cases in France  ()
     Deaths        Recoveries        Active cases

Feb Feb Mar Mar Apr Apr Last 15 days Last 15 days

Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-02-25
13(n.a.) 1
2020-02-26
18(+38%) 1(=)
2020-02-27
38(+111%) 1(=)
2020-02-28
57(+50%) 1(=)
2020-02-29
100(+75%) 1(=)
2020-03-01
130(+30%) 2(+100%)
2020-03-02
191(+47%) 2(=)
2020-03-03
212(+10%) 4(+2 +100%)
2020-03-04
285(+34%) 4(=)
2020-03-05
423(+48%) 7(+75%)
2020-03-06
613(+45%) 9(+29%)
2020-03-07
949(+55%) 16(+78%)
2020-03-08
1,126(+19%) 21(+31%)
2020-03-09
1,412(+25%) 25(+19%)
2020-03-10
1,784(+26%) 33(+32%)
2020-03-11
2,281(+28%) 48(+45%)
2020-03-12
2,876(+26%) 61(+27%)
2020-03-13
3,661(+28%) 75(+23%)
2020-03-14
4,499(+23%) 91(+21%)
2020-03-15
5,423(+20%) 127(+40%)
2020-03-16
6,633(+22%) 148(+17%)
2020-03-17
7,730(+17%) 175(+18%)
2020-03-18
9,134(+18%) 244(+39%)
2020-03-19
10,995(+20%) 372(+54%)
2020-03-20
12,612(+15%) 450(+21%)
2020-03-21
14,459(+15%) 562(+25%)
2020-03-22
16,689(+15%) 674(+20%)
2020-03-23
19,856(+19%) 860(+28%)
2020-03-24
22,302(+12%) 1,100(+28%)
2020-03-25
25,233(+13%) 1,331(+21%)
2020-03-26
29,155(+15%) 1,696(+27%)
2020-03-27
32,964(+13%) 1,995(+18%)
2020-03-28
37,575(+14%) 2,314(+16%)
2020-03-29
40,174(+6.9%) 2,606(+13%)
2020-03-30
44,550(+11%) 3,024(+16%)
2020-03-31
52,128(+17%) 3,523(+17%)
2020-04-01
56,989(+9.3%) 4,032(+14%)
2020-04-02
59,105(+3.7%) 5,387(+34%[i])
Sources: Agence Santé Publique France / Ministère des Solidarites et de la Santé[12]

Notes:

  1. ^ Includes 884 death cases from Établissement d'hébergement pour personnes âgées dépendantes (Old People's Homes - EHPADs), previously not taken into account

First confirmed cases

On 24 January, the first COVID-19 case in Europe was confirmed in Bordeaux. A 48-year-old French citizen from China, who arrived in France on 22 January, was hospitalised at Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux. Service d'Aide Médicale Urgente took charge and the patient was isolated in the hospital. The authorities tried to confirm whether he had infected people who were in contact with him.[13]

Two more cases were confirmed in Paris by the end of the day – a couple who had returned from China on 18 January.[3][14][15] The 31-year-old man and his 30-year-old partner, both from Wuhan, tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and were hospitalised at Bichat–Claude Bernard Hospital in Paris.

On 28 January, an 80-year-old Chinese tourist from Hubei tested positive and was hospitalised at Bichat–Claude Bernard Hospital,[5] the following day, his 50-year-old daughter tested positive and was admitted to the same hospital.[16] The 80-year-old Chinese tourist died on 14 February, marking the first death from COVID-19 in outside of Asia.[6]

On 30 January, a Paris doctor who had come into contact with a Chinese tourist whose infection was confirmed upon her return to China was confirmed positive for COVID-19.[17]

Case Date Age Gender Nationality Hospital admitted to Source of infection Status Note Source
1 24 January 2020 48 Male French Hôpital Pellegrin, Bordeaux China Discharged First case in Europe. Wine merchant back from China. Out of hospital on 13 February. [18][19]
2 30 Male Chinese Hôpital Bichat, Paris Discharged Couple living in France back from China. Out of hospital on 12 February. [20][21][22]
3 31 Female Discharged
4 28 January 2020 80 Male Dead Chinese tourist. Died 14 February, first in Europe. He was in very serious condition during his hospitalisation. [23]
5 29 January 2020 50 Female Discharged Chinese tourist. Daughter of the fourth infected. It is not clear if she had the virus in China or contracted it from her father. Out of hospital at the start of the third week of February. [24][25]
6 30 January 2020 Unknown Male French Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris France Discharged Doctor infected by a patient, who later returned to Asia. Out of hospital on 14 February. [17]

Les Contamines-Montjoie cluster

On 8 February, Minister of Health Agnès Buzyn confirmed five new cases which originated from a group of people who were on a holiday in Les Contamines-Montjoie, Haute-Savoie.[26] They contracted the infection from a British national who had attended a conference at Grand Hyatt in Singapore a few days before.[27]

Another British national, who had stayed in the same chalet as the five other individuals at Les Contamines-Montjoie tested positive for COVID-19.[28] On 18 February, the new Minister of Health, Olivier Véran – the replacement for Agnès Buzyn, who had stood down to contest the mayoral election for Paris for LREM – announced that only four people remained infected in France. These four, all British nationals, underwent quarantine at the hospital, three from the first group of Les Contamines-Montjoie and a fourth case which was discovered later.[25] The last remaining British national was discharged six days later.[29]

Sundry cases

A religious week in Mulhouse that took place from 17 to 24 February 2020 was involved in the rapid spread of the virus to eastern France and beyond. Linked cases developed from early March in Orléans, Besançon, Saint-Lô, Belfort, Dijon, Mâcon, Agen, Briançon, Paris, Corsica and French Guiana[30][8]

In late February multiple cases appeared in France, notably within three new clusters, in Oise,[31] Haute-Savoie[32] and Morbihan.[33]

Number of cases (blue) and number of deaths (red) on a logarithmic scale.

On 25 February, a Chinese man who had returned from China was confirmed as a carrier of SARS-CoV-2, but showed signs of recent recovery. A 64-year-old man from La Balme-de-Sillingy, who returned from a trip to Lombardy on 15 February, tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and was treated in Centre Hospitalier Annecy-Genevois, Épagny-Metz-Tessy.[34][35][36] His wife also tested positive and was admitted to the same hospital as her husband.[37][38]

On 26 February, a 36-year-old man, who had made multiple trips to Lombardy, tested positive and was treated in Nouvel Hôspital Civil, Strasbourg.[39][40][41][42] A 60-year-old French teacher from Oise was first admitted to Creil Hospital, then transferred to Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, where he died a few hours later.[43][42][44] A 55-year-old man from Oise was admitted to the intensive care unit at CHU Amiens-Picardie, Amiens.[45]

On 27 February, the Minister of Health Olivier Véran announced that France had 38 cases of COVID-19 on its soil, with 20 new cases detected including a cluster in the Oise caused by close contacts with patients that were infected in Egypt.[46]

On 28 February, one new case was confirmed, a 23-year-old fashion student from Nice who had recently returned from Milan.[47] Landes confirmed the first case of COVID-19 in the region, a woman who tested positive at Centre Hospitalier de Mont-de-Marsan and underwent isolation.[48]

Mulhouse cluster

The annual gathering of the Christian Open Door Church between 17 and 24 February in Mulhouse which was attended by about 2,500 people became a significant cluster in the spread of coronavirus in France.[7] Alerted by a parishioner and by 18 family members who tested positive on 1 March, the pastor notified the health authorities.[8][49] A man who lived alone in Nîmes – and who had driven back alone from Mulhouse and who otherwise had no close contacts – tested positive, and the flurry of reported cases locally on 2 March brought the existence of a Mulhouse cluster to light.[8] On 3 March, seven participants in the evangelical rally – including five members of a local family and a general practitioner from Bernwiller – had tested positive for the virus.[50][51][52] Starting on the evening of 3 March, the local helpline of the Emergency medical services recorded an unprecedented flood of distress calls, from people who had attended the gathering.[7] According to an investigative report by Radio France, at least half of the attendees had contracted the virus; in an interview on France Info, the pastor of the church admitted that 2000 attendees may have been infected.[7] It is said that no specific health advice existed in light of the threat at the time.[8][49] The source of the initial infection has not been determined; furthermore, as different attendees were welcomed each day, and due to the absence of any attendance register, epidemiological followup subsequent to the discovery of attendees who tested positive was rendered impossible.[8] Even President Emmanuel Macron had spent several hours electioneering on 18 February in the Bourtzwiller district close to the church. It was only on 2 March when the health authorities woke up to data that there was an outbreak all over the country linked to the religious meeting, by which time secondary infections had spread out of control.[8]

A Radio France investigation identified that one nurse who had attended the event was the origin of a subsequent cluster in Strasbourg at her workplace at the Strasbourg University Hospitals involving some 250 hospital colleagues.[7] Five returnees from the Mulhouse rally were confirmed in French Guiana on 4 March.[53] On 5 March, a retired couple from Lot-et-Garonne and another person from Deux-Sèvres who had attended the same Mulhouse gathering were declared positive for the disease.[54] Five new cases from this cluster were registered in Corsica,[55] and three in Normandy.[56] By 6 March, with 81 cases had been detected in the previous 24 hours in Mulhouse, the departmental prefect declared that the means were no longer sufficient to systematically screen all suspected cases; only the most serious patients were to be hospitalised.[57] The department of Haut Rhin, in which Mulhouse is situated, imposed strict limits on the gatherings; all schools were closed henceforth.[58]

Repatriations

On 31 January approximately 220 French returnees from China landed at Istres-Le Tubé Air Base, aboard an Airbus A340 from Esterel 3/60 transport squadron stationed at Creil Air Base.[59] These evacuees were quarantined in a holiday camp in Carry-le-Rouet.[60][61][62] A second wave of repatriation took place on 2 February when 65 evacuated French nationals on board a chartered Airbus A380-800 Hi Fly landed at the Istres air base.[63] A third repatriation of 38 French occurred on 8 February 2020 under the auspices of the British government.[64]

On 21 February a further thirty French people who had been staying in Wuhan were repatriated to Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris, and placed in quarantine at Branville, in the Calvados.[65][66] On 13 March twelve trainee gendarmes at the School of Gendarmerie of Tulle (Corrèze) saw their internship in Spain terminated, with them and their 20 companions repatriated.[67] They had been confined from 10 March 2020 following the positive test results of two of their Spanish cohort.[68]

Municipal elections

The first round of municipal elections in France took place on 15 March 2020 against the backdrop of the government decision to move to Stage III of measures to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Stringent restrictions on public life involving the closure of bars, restaurants and other businesses considered non-essential were set to begin the following day.[69] Then-Health Minister, Agnès Buzyn, resigned on 16 February 2020 to run for the Paris mayor for LREM.[70] She is succeeded by Olivier Véran, a neurologist. The decision to press ahead with the election was justified as being critical to democratic life in the country, despite concerns about how a second round could be held as the toll of infections and deaths continued to rise.[69] In the end, the turnout of registered voters was 40%, lower than achieved in 1971 – the previous record lowest turnout.[69]

Youngest victim

A 16-year-old girl residing in the Paris region who had no known co-morbidity became the youngest French victim of the disease.[71] She had developed a mild cough but was subsequently admitted to hospital upon feeling short of breath. Her condition deteriorated and she died a week later, on 26 March.[71]

Health officials remained emphatic that severe cases are very rare in young people. In a weekly briefing, Director of Health, Jérôme Salomon, said that the 15 to 44 year age group represented only 8% of serious Coronovirus cases admitted to hospital, and half of the cases exhibited pre-existing health conditions.[72] Up to 24 March, only 5 cases out of 507 certified deaths were in the 15-44 age group, and all had pre-existing health issues.[72]

Situation by region

Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes

On 25 February, a man from La Balme-de-Sillingy, who had returned from Italy, was declared infected and hospitalised in Annecy. He had been asymptomatic the previous evening, and so was the trigger for a cluster in Haute-Savoie.[73][74] One day later his wife was hospitalised.[38] On 27 February, a friend and his daughter followed him into the hospital[75] On 2 March, 26 people were COVID-19 positive in Haute-Savoie. The hospital in Annecy being saturated, a case was transferred to Chambéry.[76] François Daviet, the mayor of La Balme-de-Sillingy was also hospitalised.[77]

On 27 February, a man from Francheville was admitted to a Lyon hospital and tested positive for coronavirus.[78] Three new cases were reported in the city of Lyon on 1 March.[77]

A couple from Divonne-les-Bains were infected after a journey in Italy and hospitalised in neighbouring Switzerland on 29 February.[79][80] On the same day, two other men from Ferney-Voltaire, one French national who works in Switzerland and one Italian national, were also hospitalised in the Helvetic Country.[81]

On 2 March, a 89-year-old woman from Nyons was treated at Valréas hospital in the Enclave of the Popes in Vaucluse and tested COVID-19 positive.[82] On the same day there were four new cases in Haute-Savoie.[83]

Burgundy-Franche-Comté

On 2 March 10 cases were reported at the Dijon hospital.[84] The first wave was reported on 27 February with cases related to the Oise cluster[85][86] who subsequently infected their relatives. Five new cases of COVID-19 were confirmed on 3 March. The 15 cases in the region received care at Dijon CHU. Four cases in Côte-d'Or had been in contact with someone who was already hospitalised, while another case in Saône-et-Loire was in Italy the previous week.[87]

Brittany

On 2 March 19 cases were reported in Brittany.[88] Two were in the western city of Brest, an elderly person from Plougonvelin, returning from a trip from Egypt[89][90] and his wife.[91] There were also four cases in the capital of the region Rennes, a firefighter and his wife, and two people who had returned from Veneto.[88] 13 others cases were reported in Morbihan, around a cluster of 6 in Crac'h, 3 in Auray, 3 in Carnac and 1 in Saint-Philibert.[88]

The fourth death of the country, and the first one in Brittany was registered, a 92-year-old man, hospitalised in Vannes.[92][93]

As of 29 March 962 cases had been reported as follows : 208 in Ille-et-Vilaine, 230 in Finistère, 313 in Morbihan and 107 in Côtes d'Armor.[94]

French Guiana

As of 4 March, French Guiana had five confirmed cases, all in Saint-Laurent du Maroni.[95]

Grand Est

On 26 February, a 36-year-old man who had made repeated trips to the Italian region of Lombardy was hospitalised in Strasbourg but didn't have severe symptoms.[43][41]

On 2 March, it was announced that ten more people tested positive in the Grand Est, eight hospitalised in Strasbourg and three in Nancy. In Alsace, a Molsheim couple was hospitalised. The man had returned from Italy and was hospitalised first, followed by his wife. Four members of a family from Hésingue, a 27-year-old mother and her two children aged five and one, as well as one of the grandfathers, a 57-year-old man, were infected. Two others cases identified in the Bas-Rhin, a 49-year-old man and his 14-year-old son, had been in contact with a person from the Oise hospitalised in Amiens.[96] Three family members were hospitalised in Nancy, a father and his son, aged 50 and 23, and the girl-friend of the 50-year-old patient, all from the department of Aisne.[97]

Guadeloupe

Hauts-de-France

As of 2 March 67 people[98] were infected by COVID-19 in the Hauts-de-France region. This figure, the highest in France, was linked to a major cluster originating in the city of Creil, in the Oise, whose source remains unknown. The five departments of Hauts-de-France now each had at least one proven case of people infected by the coronavirus. In Aisne and Pas-de-Calais, spared by the epidemic until 1 March, the authorities confirmed the presence of patients with COVID-19, except the Nord where hospitalisations without local infections had taken place.

Some days before, on 26 February, a man died overnight after being rushed to a Paris hospital from Creil where he was hospitalised for 6 days in ICU in serious condition, bringing the total death toll in the country to two at that time.[43][42] On 2 March, it was announced the second death in Hauts-de-France and the third at the national level, a woman of 89 "diagnosed post-mortem" at the hospital of Compiègne. She had other serious pre-existing conditions.[98]

Île-de-France

On 25 February, a young woman returned from China was hospitalised in the Bichat–Claude Bernard Hospital, Paris but showed signs of recovery and was out of hospital on 26 February.[73][99][32]

On 28 February, an infected person from the Val-d'Oise, returning from Italy was hospitalised in Bichat–Claude Bernard Hospital, Paris. He was working for an exterior employee of Charles de Gaulle Airport.[100][101] On the same day, Hôpital Tenon [fr], which had received a patient from the Oise before he had been diagnosed, announced that it had been directly affected by the coronavirus with three infected medical personnel.[102]

Two cases of Coronavirus had been identified in Seine-Saint-Denis in Montreuil in the same family, a father and his child, on 2 March.[103]

Martinique

Mayotte

Normandy

On 27 February, a doctor from the Rouen University Hospital was declared a positive carrier of COVID-19 and was confined to his home, after a professional journey to Munich.[104] A second case of coronavirus was confirmed in Normandy on 2 March. He is a French resident in Eure. He was hospitalised at the Rouen University Hospital.[105]

New Aquitaine

After news of the first infected individuals in Europe had been released during the first wave of coronavirus in France,[18] three new patients were declared COVID-19 positive in February a patient in Bordeaux, hospitalised at the Bordeaux University Hospital, returned from a stay in Italy in a city affected by coronavirus, a soldier from Rochefort, Charente-Maritime, who has had contacts with people from the Creil air base in the Oise, hospitalised in Poitiers, and a woman from Mont-de-Marsan was also in contact with grouped cases in Creil, hospitalised in Bordeaux.[106]

Occitania

Three cases were declared in Occitania in February. First, a man who was back from Italy was diagnosed on 27 February,[107] followed by his wife one day later[108] and a 41-year-old man who was recently in Emilia-Romagna. These cases were reported in the city of Montpellier. On 1 March, it was announced that the two children of the couple were hospitalised, but only one was COVID-19 positive.[109]

On 2 March, two new cases were announced in Montpellier, a 31-year-old man and his 29-year-old wife, also back from Emilia-Romagna, bringing the total number to 6 cases.[110] One day later, a new case was announced, a 70-year-old man who lives in the village of Boisset-et-Gaujac, in the Gard. He was hospitalised in Nîmes.[111]

Pays de la Loire

A 58-year-old woman, a general practitioner, tested positive for coronavirus and was hospitalised on 27 February at the Nantes University Hospital. This was the first confirmed case in the Pays de la Loire region. She lives near Compiègne, in the Oise department, where a dozen cases had already been identified. She received a consultation on 13 February with a patient who has since been hospitalised in Amiens in the intensive care unit.[112][113]

On 2 March, four people were hospitalised at the Angers University Hospital for cases of coronavirus.[114] The first case was detected on 28 February; a 27-year-old woman from the Sarthe declared herself to the SAMU centre 15 after a stay in Milan in Italy. Three other cases have since been detected in Mayenne and Maine-et-Loire. They were infected by a patient from Brest.[115]

Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur

The first case of the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region was announced on 28 February. A young woman from Cannes was infected after a journey in Milan.[116] One day later three new cases were hospitalised, two French vacationers returned from a risk zone and an Italian tourist.[117] Two new cases appeared during the weekend of 29 February and 1 March: a 15-year-old adolescent and a 23-year-old woman.[118] On 2 March, a seventh case was announced, a 3-year-old girl.[118]

On 29 February Monaco announced its first COVID-19 case, a man who was admitted to the Princess Grace Hospital Centre, then transferred to the Nice University Hospital in France.[119]

On 22 March the Alpes-Maritimes prefecture issued a decree putting into place a curfew from 10 pm to 5 am affecting cities of more than 10,000 residents and all towns on the Mediterranean coast until 31 March 2020. This replaced local measures which had already been taken in Nice, Béziers, and Cannes.[120]

Saint Barthélemy

A resident of the French island of Saint Barthélemy was diagnosed with COVID-19 on 1 March. His parents on the neighbouring island of Saint Martin also tested positive.[121]

Saint-Martin

A couple from the French part of Saint Martin island was diagnosed with COVID-19 on 1 March. Their son, who lives on the neighbouring island of Saint Barthélemy, also tested positive.[121]

French Polynesia

Maina Sage, a French politician representing French Polynesia at the French national assembly, was diagnosed with the first case of COVID-19 in French Polynesia on 11 March.

New Caledonia

As of 19 March, there have been two cases in New Caledonia.[122]

Effects on civilian life

Closures

On 28 February, the fashion designer agnès b. (not to be confused with Agnès Buzyn) cancelled fashion shows in Paris Fashion Week, which had been scheduled to run until 3 March.[123] The following day, the Paris half marathon scheduled for Sunday 1 March with 44,000 participants was cancelled as one of a number of measures announced by health minister Olivier Véran.[124]

On 13 March, the Ligue de Football Professionnel suspended Ligue 1 and Ligue 2 (the top two divisions of football in France) indefinitely due to health risks.[125]

On 14 March, many cultural institutions announced their closure. These are mainly Parisian institutions or institutions in the Paris region, such as Louvre, Centre Georges Pompidou, Eiffel Tower, Musée d'Orsay, or Château de Versailles,[126] but also institutions in the provinces such as Château de Montsoreau – Museum of Contemporary Art,[127] CAPC – Musée d'Art Contemporain de Bordeaux, MUCEM in Marseille.[128]

Restrictions on movement

As of 23 March 2020[129], all people are required to complete and carry an attestation form to leave their homes and can be fined for non-essential journeys.[130] Essential journeys include shopping for food, travelling to work, accessing healthcare, and exercising within 1km of the household.

Foreign cases

On 29 February 2020, Monaco announced the first COVID-19 case, a man who was admitted at the Princess Grace Hospital Centre, then transferred to Nice University Hospital in France.[119] On the other side, three French nationals and one Italian resident from the department of Ain were diagnosed positive and hospitalised in Lausanne or other places in Switzerland.[131]

Seizure of masks

One fifth of all surgical procedures in the EU use personal protective equipment manufactured in Asia by the Swedish company Mölnlycke. The company's main distribution warehouse for southern Europe is in Lyon. Mölnlycke's entire stock of an estimated six million masks was seized by the French government, despite it having already been promised to other EU governments, causing a diplomatic incident which resulted in Swedish representations at the highest level in the EU.[clarification needed] Mölnlycke responded to a second attempted seizure by French officials by refusing to land any further product and rerouting deliveries to other ports in Europe. Currently Mölnlycke will no longer land PPE destined for other EU countries in France as the French government are no longer considered reliable.[132]

Chloroquine controversy

On 17 March 2020, Didier Raoult of the Mediterranean infectious and tropical disease institute in Marseille announced in a YouTube video entitled “Coronavirus: endgame!” that a trial by his team involving 24 patients supported the claim that hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin were effective in treating COVID-19.[133][134] The design of the study as well as its conclusions are controversial and generally viewed as flawed and inconclusive.[135] Raoult has nevertheless offered testing of potential sufferers at his institute and prescription of hydroxychloroquine to those who tested positive.[135] The French Health Minister, Olivier Véran, announced that "new tests will now go ahead in order to evaluate the results of Raoult, to independently replicate the trials and ensure the findings are scientifically robust, before any possible decision might be made to roll any treatment out to the wider public".[136][137] On 30 March, hospitals reported two dozen cases – and three deaths – of individuals who were suspected of self-medication with Plaquénil – branded name for Chloroquine – drug safety agency (ANSM) warned against potentially fatal side effects, notably cardiac arrhythmia and heart attack. The agency cautioned against use outside of hospitals, clinical trials, and stepped up surveillance.[138]

Sanofi, manufacturer of Plaquénil, offered French authorities millions of doses of the drug for use against COVID-19.[137]

Swiss and German help

On 22 March 2020, Switzerland announced that three hospitals near the Alsace region have agreed to take in any French-based patients after Alsace officials made a request for assistance.[139] Patients from Grand Est were also taken into hospitals in Baden-Württemberg, Rhineland-Palatinate, Saarland and Hesse in Germany.

Up to 1 April 2020 over 100 COVID-19 patients from Alsace had been transferred for treatment to Germany, Luxembourg and Switzerland.[140]

Statistics

(Source: official daily statistics from Minister of Health [1])

Situation on 27 March 2020[141]
Region Département Number of cases Hospitalised ICU Recovered Dead
Auvergne – Rhône Alpes Ain 2,093 49 9 17 2
Allier 18 2 27 4
Ardèche 54 9 45 9
Cantal 7 4 2 0
Drôme 129 35 39 21
Isère 114 29 52 4
Loire 262 51 44 20
Haute-Loire 14 6 12 1
Puy-de-Dôme 27 5 14 0
Rhône 741 139 224 82
Savoie 61 15 24 3
Haute-Savoie 162 40 106 19
Bourgogne – Franche-Comté Côte-d'Or 1,569 170 42 138 34
Doubs 100 37 60 21
Jura 48 12 5 0
Nièvre 6 3 0 0
Haute-Saône 67 32 22 6
Saône-et-Loire 165 27 145 32
Yonne 37 21 67 56
Territoire-de-Belfort 147 30 60 43
Brittany Côtes-d'Armor 603 32 5 3 1
Finistère 41 9 23 5
Ille-et-Vilaine 53 16 38 3
Morbihan 89 19 67 25
Centre-Val de Loire Cher 645 12 4 3 2
Eure-et-Loir 68 25 13 10
Indre 29 7 2 7
Indre-et-Loire 51 15 18 3
Loir-et-Cher 24 4 8 0
Loiret 63 25 20 4
Corsica Corse-du-Sud 250
Haute-Corse
Grand Est Ardennes 5,479 14 8 2 0
Aube 61 13 3 6
Marne 218 47 80 20
Haute-Marne 49 10 17 8
Meurthe-et-Moselle 253 109 54 35
Meuse 128 13 37 13
Moselle 691 127 171 122
Bas-Rhin 787 223 234 107
Haut-Rhin 963 128 409 290
Vosges 126 21 67 56
Hauts-de-France Aisne 1,753 132 35 90 37
Nord 331 129 77 35
Oise 232 52 120 66
Pas-de-Calais 121 44 61 9
Somme 177 42 53 22
Ile-de-France Paris 12,108[142] 1,656 441 443 180
Seine-et-Marne 321 110 108 21
Yvelines 452 100 135 53
Essonne 453 100 80 18
Hauts-de-Seine 967 234 261 74
Seine-Saint-Denis 680 133 125 82
Val-de-Marne 760 158 210 69
Val-d'Oise 504 113 246 81
Normandy Calvados 688 63 21 12 2
Eure 37 10 0 1
Manche 26 7 11 4
Orne 15 5 25 1
Seine-Maritime 172 50 25 16
Nouvelle-Aquitaine Charente 912 27 5 8 4
Charente-Maritime 36 13 16 0
Corrèze 16 6 1 3
Creuse 6 2 0 0
Dordogne 41 5 16 0
Gironde 204 53 91 15
Landes 10 3 2 0
Lot-et-Garonne 17 5 5 3
Pyrénées-Atlantiques 48 11 21 5
Deux-Sèvres 16 1 13 2
Vienne 28 8 15 6
Haute-Vienne 33 4 3 4
Occitanie Ariège 1,082 8 1 4 0
Aveyron 24 6 13 5
Gard 25 11 19 6
Haute-Garonne 156 56 52 5
Gers 15 4 1 0
Hérault 177 43 81 13
Lot 3 1 5 0
Lozère 7 2 3 0
Hautes-Pyrénées 17 3 5 1
Pyrénées-Orientales 112 32 37 9
Tarn 25 12 8 1
Tarn-et-Garonne 4 2 2 1
Pays de la Loire Loire-Atlantique 368 128 33 33 12
Maine-et-Loire 91 22 73 10
Mayenne 45 6 3 3
Sarthe 53 12 22 3
Vendée 54 11 10 3
Provence-Alpes-Côte-d'Azur Alpes-de-Haute-Provence 1,927 11 1 18 0
Hautes-Alpes 32 7 22 1
Alpes-Maritimes 99 22 99 12
Bouches-du-Rhône 525 110 334 20
Var 141 33 138 12
Vaucluse 42 13 31 3
Subtotal France Métropolitaine 25,029 17,019 4,123 6,181 2,221
French Guiana 28
Martinique 66 1
Saint Martin 11 2
Saint Barthélémy 3 1
Guadeloupe 76 1
Mayotte 35
Réunion 141 1
Subtotal Overseas France 364 4 2
Total 37,575 17,019 4,123 6,185 2,223


Apart from the Petite couronne,[23] cases have been detected either by a late discovery or by a local infection in the following departments: Gironde,[19] Haute-Savoie,[32] Bas-Rhin,[43] Val-d'Oise,[101] Hérault,[107] Finistère,[90] Lyon Metropolis,[78] Côte-d'Or,[85] Alpes-Maritimes,[116] Seine-Maritime,[104] Loire-Atlantique,[143] Ain,[144] Landes,[48] Charente-Maritime,[145] Mayenne,[115][115] Ille-et-Vilaine,[146] Morbihan,[88] Haut-Rhin,[96] Eure,[105] Sarthe,[114] Gard,[111] Drôme,[82] Saône-et-Loire,[87] all the departments of the region Hauts-de-France, except the Nord,[147] and in the overseas territories of Saint Barthélemy and Saint Martin.[121]


COVID-19 cases in France by region and date ()

Métropole Outremer Confirmed cases Deaths
Date ARA BFC BRE CVL COR GES HDF IDF NOR NAQ OCC PDL PACA La R. S-M S-B Mart. Guad. May. Guy.
New Total New Total
2020-01-24 2 1 3 3 0
2020-01-28 1 1 4 0
2020-01-29 1 1 5 0
2020-01-30 1 1 6 0
2020-02-08 5 5 11 0
2020-02-14 11 1 1
2020-02-15 1 1 12 1
2020-02-25 1 1 2 14 1
2020-02-26 1 1 2 4 18 1 2
2020-02-27 3 4 1 2 3 1 1 1 16 34 2
2020-02-28 2 1 1 2 2 2 3 1 14 48
2020-02-29 4 4 3 1 1 1 3 17 65
2020-03-01 5 4 44 3 2 58 123
2020-03-02 15 4 15 7 8 25 1 2 1 2 80 203
2020-03-03 3 1 2 1 1 1 9 212
2020-03-04 9 3 4 25 6 18 3 2 2 3 3 78 290
2020-03-05 15 23 6 2 3 39 9 21 4 2 1 5 2 132 422
2020-03-06 11 39 3 9 59 23 13 5 3 7 8 8 2 190 612
2020-03-07 27 28 8 5 2 114 76 89 6 18 2 12 387 999
2020-03-08 45 6 19 1 28 12 65 11 12 11 7 14 231 1230
2020-03-09 35 7 12 5 48 8 57 3 10 13 1 20 219 1449
2020-03-10 29 27 10 1 4 154 28 34 12 15 1 1 17 1 334 1783
2020-03-11 53 9 13 2 9 114 54 158 17 12 26 7 22 1 497 2280
2020-03-12 65 64 23 10 13 121 86 85 14 21 46 7 36 2 1 1 595 2875
2020-03-13 87 53 38 3 21 212 48 144 29 27 39 14 65 2 2 1 785 3660
2020-03-14 38 67 27 21 21 174 69 228 30 16 42 27 69 1 4 2 1 1 838 4498
2020-03-15 69 73 25 17 9 293 41 260 16 14 29 16 49 3 2 5 3 924 54202
2020-03-16 95 95 26 19 11 165 78 553 13 34 19 10 75 1 12 4 1210 6632
2020-03-17 92 42 14 13 19 277 27 415 18 22 49 18 73 3 1 3 9 2 1097 7729
2020-03-18 148 44 26 25 7 343 53 516 34 37 60 2 96 2 1 4 6 1404 9133
2020-03-19 156 103 24 29 10 480 35 691 33 43 73 32 119 5 9 12 3 4 1861 10994
2020-03-20 87 74 49 62 6 363 59 434 46 152 93 30 133 19 6 1 1614 12608
2020-03-21 165 133 13 35 5 83 32 877 58 89 74 44 215 9 1 5 5 4 3 1850 14458
2020-03-22 165 275 38 37 10 306 145 588 117 91 60 36 331 17 1 7 2 3 1 2230 16685
2020-03-23 299 169 93 70 11 861 333 928 49 64 96 23 138 7 2 9 4 10 1 3167 19852
2020-03-24 127 163 36 89 23 666 263 587 75 113 133 50 85 12 4 11 6 3 2446 22298
2020-03-25 236 59 77 111 8 557 221 862 102 123 182 25 332 11 3 9 3 5 5 2931 25229
2020-03-26
Total 2093 1569 603 561 225 5479 1753 7660 688 912 1082 368 1924 94 11 2 66 76 35 28 - 25229
Subtotal 24917 312
Source: ARS / Santé Publique France / Ministère des Solidarités/Santé


Simulation statistics

Simulation studies helped convince the government that taking no action would result in large numbers of civilian casualties. In such a case between 30,000 and 100,000 more ICU beds would be required in the hospitals. In France there are 5,000 réanimation beds and 7,364 ICU beds. This simulation was provided by Neil Ferguson, epidemiologist at the Imperial College London.[148]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Infection au nouveau Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), COVID-19, France et Monde" (in French). Santé Publique France. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  2. ^ "Nombre cumulé de personnes retournées à domicile depuis le 1er mars 2020 - hommes et femmes" (in French). Santé Publique France. Retrieved 3 April 2020.
  3. ^ a b Jacob, Etienne (24 January 2020). "Coronavirus: trois premiers cas confirmés en France". Le Figaro (in French).
  4. ^ Bernard-Stoecklin, S (13 February 2020). "First cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in France: surveillance, investigations and control measures, January 2020". Eurosurveillance. 25(6). PMC 7029452 – via PMC.
  5. ^ a b "Wuhan virus: France confirms fourth case of coronavirus in elderly Chinese tourist". The Straits Times. 29 January 2020. Archived from the original on 20 February 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  6. ^ a b "First coronavirus death confirmed in Europe". BBC News. 15 February 2020. Archived from the original on 19 February 2020. Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d e "Coronavirus : la « bombe atomique » du rassemblement évangélique de Mulhouse". Le Point. 28 March 2020.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g "ENQUETE FRANCEINFO. "La majorité des personnes étaient contaminées" : de la Corse à l'outre-mer, comment le rassemblement évangélique de Mulhouse a diffusé le coronavirus dans toute la France". Franceinfo. 28 March 2020.
  9. ^ "Point de situation coronavirus du 24 mars" [Coronavirus update on March 24] (Press release) (in French). Ministère des Solidarités et de la Santé. 24 March 2020. 3:29.
  10. ^ "Coronavirus: Spain and France announce sweeping restrictions". BBC News. 15 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  11. ^ "France imposes 15-day lockdown as part of emergency coronavirus response". The Independent. 16 March 2020.
  12. ^ "Agence nationale de santé publique". www.santepubliquefrance.fr. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  13. ^ "Coronavirus en France : le parcours des trois patients". France Info (in French). 24 January 2020. Archived from the original on 21 February 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  14. ^ "Coronavirus outbreak: First confirmed cases in Europe as France declares two infections". Sky News. Retrieved 24 January 2020.
  15. ^ "Coronavirus : deux premières contaminations confirmées en France". Le Monde (in French). 24 January 2020. Retrieved 24 January 2020.
  16. ^ "Cinquième case averé". L'Express (in French). 29 January 2020. Archived from the original on 29 January 2020. Retrieved 29 January 2020.
  17. ^ a b "Coronavirus: un sixième cas confirmé". Le Parisien (in French). 30 January 2020. Archived from the original on 31 January 2020. Retrieved 30 January 2020.
  18. ^ a b Provenzano, Elsa (26 January 2020). "Coronavirus : Que sait-on du cas détecté à Bordeaux ?". 20 Minutes (in French). Archived from the original on 19 February 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  19. ^ a b "Epidémie de coronavirus : le premier malade diagnostiqué en France affirme être guéri et sorti de l'hôpital". Franceinfo (in French). 13 February 2020. Archived from the original on 15 February 2020. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  20. ^ Jacob, Etienne (24 January 2020). "Coronavirus: trois premiers cas confirmés en France, deux d'entre eux vont bien". Le Figaro.fr (in French). Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  21. ^ à 19h01, Par V. G. avec AFPLe 29 janvier 2020; À 20h52, Modifié Le 29 Janvier 2020 (29 January 2020). "Coronavirus : le 4e cas en France s'était rendu aux urgences mais n'avait pas été retenu". Le Parisien (in French). Archived from the original on 29 January 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  22. ^ "Coronavirus : deux des onze patients hospitalisés en France sont guéris". Le Monde (in French). 12 February 2020. Archived from the original on 12 February 2020. Retrieved 12 February 2020.
  23. ^ a b "Coronavirus : un quatrième cas confirmé en France, l'homme est hospitalisé à Paris". France Bleu (in French). 28 January 2020. Archived from the original on 30 January 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  24. ^ à 20h21, Par Florence MéréoLe 29 janvier 2020; À 09h01, Modifié Le 30 Janvier 2020 (29 January 2020). "Coronavirus : un cinquième cas confirmé en France, deux patients en réanimation". Le Parisien (in French). Archived from the original on 31 January 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  25. ^ a b "Coronavirus : les quatre derniers patients en France sont hospitalisés à Lyon et Saint-Etienne". France 3 Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes (in French). Retrieved 19 February 2020.
  26. ^ "Coronavirus : 5 nouveaux cas confirmés en France". Le Figaro (in French). 8 February 2020. Archived from the original on 8 February 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  27. ^ AFP, avec (8 February 2020). "Coronavirus. La ministre de la Santé Agnès Buzyn annonce cinq nouveaux cas en France". Ouest-France (in French). Archived from the original on 9 February 2020. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  28. ^ BFMTV. "Coronavirus: le ministère de la Santé annonce un 12e cas d'infection confirmé en France" (in French). BFMTV. Archived from the original on 15 February 2020. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  29. ^ AFP, avec (24 February 2020). "Coronavirus. Une 11e guérison en France, " plus aucun malade hospitalisé "". Ouest-France (in French). Archived from the original on 24 February 2020. Retrieved 24 February 2020.
  30. ^ Raphaëlle Bacqué; Ariane Chemin (27 March 2020). "Deux mille pèlerins, cinq jours de prière et un virus : à Mulhouse, le scénario d'une contagion" (in French). Le Monde. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  31. ^ "Santé. Coronavirus : qui sont les 38 cas contaminés en France ?". dna.fr (in French). Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  32. ^ a b c "EN DIRECT – Coronavirus : un 18e cas en France, l'épouse de l'homme hospitalisé à Annecy". LCI (in French). Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  33. ^ "Le Morbihan " attend de savoir " qui est à l'origine des cas de coronavirus". 20 Minutes (in French). Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  34. ^ "Coronavirus, dall'Italia si spande in Europa. Conte: "Inaccettabili limitazioni agli italiani". Ma molti Paesi prendono misure". la Repubblica (in Italian). 25 February 2020. Retrieved 25 February 2020.
  35. ^ "France reports two new coronavirus infections, one returning from Italy". Reuters. 25 February 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  36. ^ "DIRECT. Coronavirus : deux nouveaux cas identifiés en France". la Depeche (in French). Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  37. ^ "Haute-Savoie. Coronavirus : l'épouse du patient hospitalisé à Annecy également infectée". le Dauphine (in French). Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  38. ^ a b "DIRECT. Covid-19 : le service de réanimation de l'hôpital de Creil, où a été hospitalisé le patient décédé, ferme pendant 14 jours". Franceinfo (in French). 26 February 2020. Archived from the original on 28 February 2020. Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  39. ^ "France reports second coronavirus death, Italian link in another case". Reuters. 26 February 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  40. ^ "France reports first citizen to die from coronavirus as three new cases confirmed". France 24. 26 February 2020. Archived from the original on 26 February 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  41. ^ a b "Santé. Un premier cas de coronavirus confirmé en Alsace". dna.fr (in French). Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  42. ^ a b c "Covid-19 : un mort et deux nouveaux cas recensés en France". Franceinfo (in French). 26 February 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  43. ^ a b c d "France reports first citizen to die from coronavirus as three new cases confirmed". France 24. 26 February 2020. Archived from the original on 26 February 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  44. ^ "Coronavirus : originaires de l'Oise, un homme est mort à Paris, un autre hospitalisé à Amiens dans un "état grave"". France 3 Hauts-de-France (in French). Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  45. ^ "Un patient atteint de coronavirus en réanimation à Amiens". Courrier picard (in French). 26 February 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  46. ^ "EN DIRECT – Coronavirus : le nombre de cas confirmés en France passe de 18 à 38". LCI (in French). Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  47. ^ Marshall, Jordan; Rogers, Dave; Lorenzato-Lloyd, Alice. "Mipim says show is still on as first coronavirus case confirmed in Cannes". Building. Archived from the original on 28 February 2020. Retrieved 28 February 2020.
  48. ^ a b "Landes : premier cas de coronavirus confirmé dans le département". SudOuest.fr (in French). Archived from the original on 28 February 2020. Retrieved 28 February 2020.
  49. ^ a b "Coronavirus : polémique sur le foyer de Mulhouse qui a essaimé en Lot-et-Garonne". ladepeche.fr. 24 March 2020. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  50. ^ "Mulhouse : sept cas de coronavirus après un rassemblement religieux à Bourtzwiller" [Mulhouse: seven cases of coronavirus after a religious gathering in Bourtzwiller]. France Bleu (in French). 3 March 2020. Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  51. ^ "Alsace : Un médecin de Bernwiller contaminé par le coronavirus". 3 March 2020.
  52. ^ "DIRECT. Coronavirus : le CIO n'évoque "ni annulation ni report" des JO de Tokyo" [DIRECT. Coronavirus: the IOC does not mention "neither cancellation nor postponement" of the Tokyo Olympics]. Journal L'Union (in French). 4 March 2020. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  53. ^ Catherine Lama (4 March 2020). "Coronavirus : cinq cas à Saint-Laurent du Maroni" [Coronavirus: five cases in Saint-Laurent du Maroni] (in French). Guyana: FranceTV. Retrieved 20 March 2020.
  54. ^ "Coronavirus : deux cas confirmés en Lot-et-Garonne" [Coronavirus: two cases confirmed in Lot-et-Garonne]. SudOuest.fr (in French). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  55. ^ "Trois premiers cas du nouveau coronavirus confirmés en Corse" [Three first cases of the new coronavirus confirmed in Corsica]. 20 Minutes (in French). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  56. ^ "Coronavirus EN DIRECT : Trois premiers cas dans les Hautes-Alpes… Les écoles ne fermeront pas en cas de stade 3…" [Coronavirus LIVE: Three first cases in the Hautes-Alpes… Schools will not close in case of stage 3…]. 20 Minutes (in French). Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  57. ^ Ronan Tsorière (6 March 2020). "Coronavirus : comment le Haut-Rhin et la ville de Mulhouse font face à l'explosion de l'épidémie" [Coronavirus: how the Haut-Rhin and the city of Mulhouse are coping with the explosion of the epidemic]. Le Parisien (in French). Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  58. ^ Florence Grandon (6 March 2020). "Coronavirus dans le Haut-Rhin : la totalité des écoles, collèges, lycées, crèches fermés lundi 9 mars pour 15 jours" [Coronavirus in Haut- Rhine: all schools, colleges, high schools, nurseries closed Monday March 9 for 15 days]. france3-regions.francetvinfo.fr (in French). Retrieved 21 March 2020.
  59. ^ "L'Armée de l'air au service des Français" [Air Force at the service of French]. defense.gouv.fr (in French). Retrieved 16 March 2020.
  60. ^ "Coronavirus : "Une cinquantaine de personnels mobilisés" pour accueillir des Français rapatriés à Carry-le-Rouet, selon le préfet de la région PACA" [Coronavirus: "About fifty staff mobilised" to accommodate French repatriated to Carry-le-Rouet, according to the prefect of the PACA region]. Franceinfo (in French). 30 January 2020. Retrieved 31 January 2020.
  61. ^ "Coronavirus : les premiers Français rapatriés de Chine ont atterri près de Marseille" [Coronavirus: the first French returnees from China landed near Marseille]. Le Monde (in French). 31 January 2020. Retrieved 31 January 2020.
  62. ^ "Coronavirus : ce que l'on sait sur la traque du "patient zéro" dans l'Oise" [Coronavirus: what we know about tracking e of "patient zero" in the Oise]. L'Express (in French). 2 March 2020. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  63. ^ "Coronavirus : un 2e avion a décollé pour rapatrier d'autres Français de Wuhan" [Coronavirus: a 2nd plane took off to repatriate other French people from Wuhan]. RTL.fr (in French). Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  64. ^ "Coronavirus : 3e vague de rapatriement de Wuhan, 38 Français attendus dimanche" [Coronavirus: 3rd wave of repatriation from Wuhan, 38 French expected on Sunday]. Le Parisien (in French). 7 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  65. ^ "Les Français rapatriés de Chine seront accueillis dans le Calvados" [French returnees from China will be welcomed in Calvados]. France Bleu (in French). 20 February 2020.
  66. ^ "Coronavirus : ce que l'on sait du 4e vol de Français rapatriés de Wuhan" [Coronavirus: what we know about 4th flight of French returnees from Wuhan]. LCI (in French). Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  67. ^ "Coronavirus: 120 gendarmes repatriated from Spain" [Coronavirus : 120 gendarmes rapatriés depuis l'Espagne]. europe1.fr (in French). Europe 1 Digital. 13 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  68. ^ "Coronavirus: 120 gendarmes and 20 Tulle supervisors confined to Spain" [=Coronavirus : 120 élèves gendarmes et 20 encadrants de Tulle confinés en Espagne]. lepopulaire.fr (in French). Groupe Center-France. 12 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  69. ^ a b c "French voters shun elections, enjoy sunshine despite coronavirus restrictions". 16 March 2020 – via www.reuters.com.
  70. ^ "French health minister to run for Paris mayor after sex scandal sinks previous candidate". France 24. 16 February 2020.
  71. ^ a b "16-year-old girl becomes France's youngest coronavirus victim". France 24. 27 March 2020.
  72. ^ a b "Mort d'une adolescente de 16 ans du coronavirus: les experts évoquent un cas « exceptionnel »". BFMTV.
  73. ^ a b "[DIRECT] DIRECT. Coronavirus : deux nouveaux cas de coronavirus en France". ladepeche.fr (in French). Retrieved 25 February 2020.
  74. ^ "Haute-Savoie. Le cas de coronavirus avéré dans la région est hospitalisé à Annecy". ledauphine.com (in French). Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  75. ^ "Santé. Haute-Savoie : le directeur général de la santé confirme 4 cas de coronavirus à la Balme de Sillingy". ledauphine.com (in French). Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  76. ^ "Coronavirus Covid-19 : de nouveaux cas hospitalisés à l'hôpital d'Annecy". France 3 Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes (in French). Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  77. ^ a b Faure, Anthony (2 March 2020). "Coronavirus : 4 cas à Lyon, 0 à Villefranche pour l'instant". lyoncapitale.fr (in French). Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  78. ^ a b BFMTV. "Coronavirus: ce que l'on sait des 38 cas confirmés en France" (in French). BFMTV. Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  79. ^ "Ain. Coronavirus: rentrés d'Italie, deux Aindinois contaminés". leprogres.fr (in French). Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  80. ^ "Ain. Coronavirus : un habitant du Pays de Gex infecté sans gravité et hospitalisé à Lausanne". ledauphine.com (in French). Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  81. ^ "Coronavirus : plusieurs cas confirmés dans l'Ain, à Divonne-les-Bains et Ferney-Voltaire, sans gravité". France 3 Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes (in French). Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  82. ^ a b "Un premier cas de coronavirus dans la Drôme, une Nyonsaise de 89 ans". France Bleu (in French). 3 March 2020. Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  83. ^ "Coronavirus Covid-19 : quatre nouveaux cas en Haute-Savoie dont trois liés au cluster de la Balme-de-Sillingy". France 3 Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  84. ^ "Bourgogne-Franche-Comté. Cinq nouveaux cas de coronavirus à Dijon". estrepublicain.fr (in French). Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  85. ^ a b "En direct. Coronavirus : quatre cas confirmés à Dijon". bienpublic.com (in French). Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  86. ^ "CORONAVIRUS : L'Agence Régionale de Santé annonce un cinquième cas pris en charge au CHU de Dijon". infos-dijon.com (in French). Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  87. ^ a b France, Centre (3 March 2020). "Covid-19 – Cinq nouveaux cas de coronavirus confirmés en Bourgogne Franche-Comté". lyonne.fr. Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  88. ^ a b c d "Coronavirus en Bretagne : l'Agence Régionale de Santé confirme 19 cas, la préfecture prend des mesures de restrictions". France 3 Bretagne (in French). Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  89. ^ "Cas de coronavirus à Brest : ce que l'on sait ce jeudi soir". Le Telegramme (in French). 27 February 2020. Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  90. ^ a b PAISTEL, Coline (27 February 2020). "Coronavirus. Un premier cas en Bretagne à Brest". Ouest-France (in French). Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  91. ^ "Coronavirus : quatre cas confirmés en Bretagne [Direct]". Le Télégramme (in French). 23 January 2020. Archived from the original on 17 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  92. ^ "Coronavirus en Bretagne : premier décès dans le Morbihan [Direct]". Le Telegramme (in French). 2 March 2020. Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  93. ^ "[VIDEO] Coronavirus : un quatrième mort en France, un homme de 92 ans dans le Morbihan". France 3 Bretagne (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  94. ^ "Coronavirus : informations, recommandations et mesures sanitaires | La préfecture et les services de l'État en région Bretagne". www.prefectures-regions.gouv.fr.
  95. ^ "Five coronavirus cases confirmed in French Guiana March 4, 2020". Antigua Observer. 4 March 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  96. ^ a b "Santé. Coronavirus : onze cas identifiés dans le Grand Est, dont huit en Alsace". dna.fr (in French). Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  97. ^ "Nancy. Coronavirus : un troisième cas avéré à Nancy". estrepublicain.fr (in French). Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  98. ^ a b "Coronavirus : un nouveau décès en France, 191 cas de contamination confirmés". France Bleu (in French). 2 March 2020. Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  99. ^ "Coronavirus : deux nouveaux cas en France annonce le directeur général de la Santé". France Bleu (in French). 25 February 2020. Archived from the original on 26 February 2020. Retrieved 25 February 2020.
  100. ^ "DIRECT. Covid-19 : le nombre de cas confirmés en France passe de 18 à 38, annonce le ministre de la Santé". Franceinfo (in French). 27 February 2020. Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  101. ^ a b "Un premier cas de coronavirus détecté parmi les personnels de Roissy-Charles-de-Gaulle". Le Monde (in French). 28 February 2020. Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  102. ^ Mari, Elsa (29 February 2020). "Coronavirus : 3 personnels soignants contaminés à Paris à l'hôpital Tenon". Le Parisien (in French). Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  103. ^ "Coronavirus en Seine-Saint-Denis : deux cas identifiés dans une famille de Montreuil". France Bleu (in French). 2 March 2020. Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  104. ^ a b "Un cas de coronavirus confirmé près de Rouen : un professionnel de santé confiné chez lui". paris-normandie.fr (in French). Archived from the original on 28 February 2020. Retrieved 28 February 2020.
  105. ^ a b "Coronavirus : un deuxième cas en Normandie". France Bleu (in French). 2 March 2020. Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  106. ^ "Charente-Maritime : un homme contaminé par le coronavirus a été transporté au CHU de Poitiers". France 3 Nouvelle-Aquitaine (in French). Archived from the original on 1 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  107. ^ a b "Coronavirus : un premier cas avéré à Montpellier". midilibre.fr (in French). Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  108. ^ "Coronavirus à Montpellier : deux autres cas avérés, dont l'épouse du malade déjà infecté". actu.fr (in French). Archived from the original on 28 February 2020. Retrieved 28 February 2020.
  109. ^ "Coronavirus : l'enfant contaminé à Montpellier a très peu de symptômes". France Bleu (in French). 2 March 2020. Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  110. ^ "[DIRECT] DIRECT. Coronavirus : 191 cas confirmés en France, un nouveau cas à Montpellier". ladepeche.fr (in French). Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  111. ^ a b "[VIDEO] DIRECT. Coronavirus : un quatrième décès en France, plus de 200 cas dans le pays". ladepeche.fr (in French). Archived from the original on 4 March 2020. Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  112. ^ Reuters, avec AFP et (27 February 2020). "DIRECT. Coronavirus : 38 cas désormais confirmés en France". Ouest-France (in French). Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  113. ^ Ouest-France (27 February 2020). "Coronavirus : un premier cas de contamination hospitalisé au CHU de Nantes". Ouest-France (in French). Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  114. ^ a b "Coronavirus : les quatre patients hospitalisés au CHU d'Angers sont très peu "symptomatiques"". France 3 Pays de la Loire (in French). Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  115. ^ a b c Ouest-France (28 February 2020). "Coronavirus. Trois cas avérés hospitalisés au CHU d'Angers". Ouest-France (in French). Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  116. ^ a b "Un premier cas de coronavirus confirmé dans les Alpes-Maritimes". Nice-Matin (in French). 28 February 2020. Archived from the original on 28 February 2020. Retrieved 28 February 2020.
  117. ^ "Trois nouveaux malades du coronavirus ce samedi dans les Alpes-Maritime". Nice-Matin (in French). 29 February 2020. Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  118. ^ a b "Coronavirus : un enfant de trois ans contaminé à Nice, le point sur la situation". France 3 Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur (in French). Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  119. ^ a b BFMTV. "Coronavirus: un premier cas de contamination détecté à Monaco et transféré au CHU de Nice" (in French). BFMTV. Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  120. ^ "Confinement : Nice, Mulhouse, Perpignan... Ces communes qui ont instauré un couvre-feu". L'Express (in French). 23 March 2020.
  121. ^ a b c "Coronavirus : premiers cas confirmés en Outre-mer, à Saint-Martin et Saint-Barth". Polynésie la 1ère (in French). Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  122. ^ "Coronavirus: New cases in Tahiti, New Caledonia". RNZ. 19 March 2020. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  123. ^ "French fashion label Agnes B cancels Paris show due to coronavirus". Reuters. 28 February 2020. Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  124. ^ "Paris half-marathon canceled because of coronavirus". The Washington Post. Associated Press. 29 February 2020. Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  125. ^ "Communiqué de la LFP" (in French). lfp.fr. 13 March 2020. Retrieved 13 March 2020.
  126. ^ "Coronavirus : Château de Versailles, Tour Eiffel, Louvre, Centre Pompidou, Musée d'Orsay, Olympia, Châtelet, Théâtre des Champs-Elysées... des fermetures en cascade". Franceinfo (in French). 13 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  127. ^ ROCHARD, Benoit (13 March 2020). "Montsoreau. Coronavirus : le château fermé à partir du samedi 14 mars". Courrier de l'Ouest (in French). Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  128. ^ "Marseille : le Mucem ferme ses portes". LaProvence.com (in French). 13 March 2020. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  129. ^ GOV.UK https://www.gov.uk/government/news/french-personal-travel-waiver-certificate
  130. ^ The Connexion https://www.connexionfrance.com/French-news/Man-in-France-jailed-for-flouting-Covid-19-confinement-rules-eight-times-in-five-days
  131. ^ "Haute-Savoie. Coronavirus : depuis sa chambre d'hôpital à Annecy, "pour moi il n'y a pas de danger"". ledauphine.com (in French). Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  132. ^ Marlowe, Lara. "Coronavirus: European solidarity sidelined as French interests take priority". The Irish Times. Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  133. ^ Lara Marlowe (4 January 2020). "Coronavirus: France hoping unorthodox virologist can save world". Irishtimes.com. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  134. ^ France, Connexion. "French researcher posts successful Covid-19 drug trial". www.connexionfrance.com. Retrieved 18 March 2020.
  135. ^ a b Braun, Elisa. "In France, controversial doctor stirs coronavirus debate". Finance.yahoo.com. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  136. ^ "French lab offers 'millions of doses' of Covid-19 drug". www.connexionfrance.com. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  137. ^ a b "France: Sanofi offers potential drug to beat COVID-19". Aa.com.tr. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  138. ^ "French watchdog warns of dangerous side effects of unproven COVID-19 treatments". France24.com. Retrieved 1 April 2020.
  139. ^ Bally, Gaetan (22 March 2020). "Swiss hospitals to take French coronavirus patients". swissinfo.ch (in French). Retrieved 31 March 2020.
  140. ^ Antonio Fumagalli: "So kam Frankreich zu den Plätzen auf Schweizer Intensivstationen – im Gegensatz zu Italien" Neue Zürcher Zeitung 1 April 2020
  141. ^ Deshayes, Benoit; Linternaute.com, Mis à jour le 28/03/20 19:40. "Covid-19 en France : nombre de cas de coronavirus, réanimations, morts... Tous les chiffres du 28 mars 2020". linternaute.com (in French). Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  142. ^ "Coronavirus: update on the situation in Paris and île-de-France, consultation centers open". www.sortiraparis.com.
  143. ^ "Coronavirus. La patiente prise en charge au CHU de Nantes est une médecin en vacances à La Baule". Ouest-France (in French). 28 February 2020. Archived from the original on 28 February 2020. Retrieved 27 February 2020.
  144. ^ "Ain. Un deuxième cas de coronavirus dans le Pays de Gex". ledauphine.com (in French). Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  145. ^ "EN DIRECT – Coronavirus : trois personnels de santé de l'hôpital Tenon contaminés". LCI (in French). Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  146. ^ GRISOT, Paul (29 February 2020). "INFO OUEST-FRANCE. Coronavirus : un premier cas détecté à Rennes, une femme de pompier hospitalisée". Ouest-France (in French). Archived from the original on 29 February 2020. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
  147. ^ "Le coronavirus est désormais présent dans tous les Hauts-de-France". 20 Minutes (in French). Archived from the original on 2 March 2020. Retrieved 2 March 2020.
  148. ^ Coronavirus : les simulations alarmantes des épidémiologistes pour la France 15 March 2020 Le Monde. Retrieved 15 March 2020
What is Wiki.RIP There is a free information resource on the Internet. It is open to any user. Wiki is a library that is public and multilingual.

The basis of this page is on Wikipedia. Text licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License..

Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. wiki.rip is an independent company that is not affiliated with the Wikimedia Foundation (Wikimedia Foundation).

E-mail: wiki@wiki.rip
WIKI OPPORTUNITIES
Privacy Policy      Terms of Use      Disclaimer