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2019–20 NCAA Division I women's basketball season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The 2019–20 NCAA Division I women's basketball season began in November 2019 and concluded prematurely on March 12, 2020, due to the 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic. The 2020 NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Tournament was scheduled to end at Smoothie King Center in New Orleans, Louisiana on April 5, 2020, but was ultimately canceled. All other postseason tournaments were canceled as well. Practices officially began in late September 2019.

Season headlines

  • June 18 – The ASUN Conference officially announced that Bellarmine University, currently a member of the NCAA Division II Great Lakes Valley Conference, would move to Division I and join the ASUN effective with the 2020–21 school year.[1]
  • June 20 – The Summit League announced that the University of Missouri–Kansas City would return to the conference on July 1, 2020 after seven years in the Western Athletic Conference.[2]
  • June 21 – The Boston-area sports news website Digital Sports Desk reported that the University of Connecticut (UConn) was expected to announce by the end of the month that it would leave the American Athletic Conference to rejoin many of its former conference mates in the Big East Conference in 2020.[3] The story was picked up by multiple national media outlets the next day.[4][5]
  • June 27 – The Big East and UConn jointly announced that the school would join the Big East; though the official announcements did not specify a time, it was expected that the Huskies would become members in 2020.[6]
  • July 26 – Multiple media reports indicated that UConn and The American had reached a buyout agreement that will lead to UConn joining the Big East in July 2020. The exit fee was reportedly $17 million.[7]
  • August 5 – The Horizon League announced that Purdue University Fort Wayne would leave the Summit League to join the Horizon League in July 2020.[8]
  • September 30
    • California governor Gavin Newsom signed the Fair Pay to Play Act into law, which upon taking effect in 2023 will prohibit public colleges and universities in the state from punishing their athletes for earning endorsement income. The bill places the state in direct conflict with the NCAA's current business model, which prohibits college athletes from receiving such income. At the time the bill was signed, several other states were proposing similar laws.[9]
    • Officials at Tarleton State University, current members of the Division II Lone Star Conference, announced that the school had accepted an invitation to join the Western Athletic Conference. Full details, including the joining date, were expected to be revealed in the following days, but were delayed by more than a month.[10]
  • October 4 – Officials at the University of St. Thomas, a Minnesota school that will be expelled from its longtime athletic home of the NCAA Division III Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (MIAC) in 2021, announced that the school had received an invitation to join the Summit League upon its MIAC departure. In order for St. Thomas to directly transition to the Summit, it must receive a waiver of an NCAA rule stating that Division III schools can only transition to Division II.[11]
  • October 29 – The NCAA board of governors voted unanimously to begin the process of changing institutional rules so that college athletes can profit from their names, images, and likenesses, while still maintaining a distinction between college and professional sports. The proposal calls for each of the three NCAA divisions to draft new rules consistent with this mandate, with a target date of January 2021.[12]
  • October 31 – The Associated Press preseason All-American team was released. Baylor center Lauren Cox and Oregon guard Sabrina Ionescu were unanimous selections (28 votes). Joining them on the team were Texas A&M guard Chennedy Carter (22 votes), Miami (FL) forward Beatrice Mompremier (20), and Maryland giard Kaila Charles (18). All were seniors except for Carter, a junior.[13]
  • November 5 – The first day of the regular season saw three players record triple-doubles, the most for a single day of play in NCAA history.[14]
    • Aliyah Boston of South Carolina had 12 points, 12 rebounds, and 10 blocks in the Gamecocks' 103–43 rout of Alabama State. She became the first player ever to record a triple-double in her first career game.
    • Denia Davis-Stewart of Merrimack had 31 points, 13 rebounds, and 12 blocks in the Warriors' first game in NCAA Division I, a 79–64 win over UMass.
    • Chelsea Olson of Youngstown State had 13 points, 10 rebounds, and 11 assists in the Penguins' 87–59 win over Canisius.
  • November 9 – Preseason #1 Oregon defeated the US national team 93–86 in an exhibition, led by Ionescu's 30 points. This marked the first time that Team USA had lost to college competition since a 1999 loss to Tennessee.[15]
  • November 12 – The Western Athletic Conference officially announced Tarleton State's entry into the league effective July 1, 2020.[16]
  • November 16 – Ionescu became the first NCAA player, regardless of division or sex, to record a triple-double in four different seasons.[17] She had 10 points, 13 rebounds, and 14 assists in the Ducks' 99–63 win over Texas Southern, extending her record for career triple-doubles to 19.[18]
  • November 21 – Kamiyah Street, the starting point guard for Kennesaw State, was arrested and charged with murder in the July 16, 2019 shooting death of a man whose body was found in the parking deck of an Atlanta apartment complex. Street was immediately suspended once KSU was notified of the charge.[19]
  • November 25 – Sierra'Li Wade, a freshman guard for Arkansas–Pine Bluff who had yet to make her debut for the team, was killed in a shooting in her hometown of Lake Village, Arkansas.[20]
  • November 30 – The Atlantis Paradise Island resort in The Bahamas announced that the Battle 4 Atlantis, a prominent early-season Division I men's tournament held at the resort, would add a women's tournament starting next season. The women's tournament will feature eight teams (the same number as the men's version), and will be held immediately before the men's tournament.[21]
  • February 7 – The Big South Conference officially announced that North Carolina A&T State University would leave its longtime home of the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference for the Big South effective with the 2021–22 school year.[22]
  • February 18 – The NCAA announced that it was considering a proposal that would allow student-athletes in all sports a one-time waiver to transfer to a new school without having to sit out a season. This would place all NCAA sports under the same transfer rules; currently, first-time transfers are only required to sit out a season in baseball, men's and women's basketball, football, and men's ice hockey. The existing criteria for the waiver would be extended to these five sports—namely, a player must receive a transfer release from his or her previous school, leave that school academically eligible, maintain academic progress at the new school, and not be under any disciplinary suspension.[23]
  • Responses to the coronavirus pandemic:

Milestones and records

The following players reached the 2,000-point milestone during the season—Sabrina Ionescu[29] and Ruthy Hebard,[30] both of Oregon.

Ionescu and Hebard both reached the 1,000-rebound milestone during the season. Hebard reached this milestone in the same game in which Ionescu surpassed the 2,000-point mark.[29] Ionescu reached the mark in Oregon's 74–66 win over Stanford on February 24, 2020, reaching two additional milestones during this game. She recorded her eighth triple-double of the season, tying her own record from last season for the most in a single season in NCAA history for either men or women. Ionescu also became the first player in NCAA basketball history with 2,000 points, 1,000 assists, and 1,000 rebounds in a career. She had previously joined Courtney Vandersloot of Gonzaga (2007–11) as the only Division I players with 2,000 points and 1,000 assists.[31][32]

On December 18, Baylor guard Juicy Landrum set a new Division I women's record with 14 three-pointers in the Lady Bears' 111–43 rout of Arkansas State.[33] This was more three-pointers than the Lady Bears had previously recorded as a team in a single game.[14]

Four days later, Brittany Brewer of Texas Tech tied the Division I record for blocks in a game, recording 16 as part of a triple-double in the Lady Raiders' 83–38 rout of Louisiana–Monroe.[34] Coincidentally, the previous record-holder, former TCU player Sandora Irvin, also reached that mark as part of a triple-double.[14]

Conference membership changes

Two schools joined new conferences for the 2019–20 season. Both moved between Division I and Division II, with one joining Division I and the other leaving Division I.

School Former Conference New Conference
Merrimack Northeast-10 Conference (D-II) Northeast Conference
Savannah State Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (D-II)

In addition, two existing Division I teams assumed new athletic identities.

After the 2018–19 school year, Long Island University (LIU) merged the athletic programs of its two main campuses—the Division I LIU Brooklyn Blackbirds and Division II LIU Post Pioneers—into a single program that now plays as the LIU Sharks.[35] The Sharks inherited the Division I and Northeast Conference memberships of the Brooklyn campus, with some sports to be based in Brooklyn and others at the Post campus in Brookville, New York. Specific to basketball, LIU announced that the unified men's and women's teams in that sport would be based in Brooklyn.

On July 1, 2019, the University of Missouri–Kansas City (UMKC) announced that its athletic program, formerly known as the UMKC Kangaroos, would officially become the Kansas City Roos, with "Roos" having long been used as a short form of the former "Kangaroos" nickname.[36]

Arenas

New arenas

Arenas closing

Temporary arenas

  • Immediately after the 2018–19 season, Duquesne began an extensive renovation of the on-campus Palumbo Center. When the venue reopens, expected for the 2020–21 school year, it will be renamed UPMC Cooper Fieldhouse, via a partnership between the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and the family foundation of late Duquesne star Chuck Cooper, the first African American selected in an NBA draft. At the time of announcement, the final capacity of the renovated venue had not been determined, but Duquesne's athletic director expected it to have about the same capacity as the pre-renovation Palumbo Center (4,390). Duquesne's temporary home venue had also not yet been announced, but it was expected that PPG Paints Arena would be used for at least some men's home games.[40][41] Duquesne revealed its plans for the 2019–20 women's season in two phases, announcing its non-conference schedule on September 5, 2019[42] and its conference schedule on September 30.[43] The following four venues will be used:
    • PPG Paints Arena will host two games. The first is the season opener; it will be the second leg of a doubleheader with the men's team. The second will be the opening leg of a doubleheader with the men.
    • One game will be at Donahue Pavilion on the campus of Oakland Catholic High School in Pittsburgh's Oakland neighborhood.
    • The bulk of the women's schedule, nine games in all, will be at the Kerr Fitness Center on the campus of La Roche University in the northern suburb of McCandless.
    • The season finale will be at Robert Morris' new UPMC Events Center.

Season outlook

Pre-season polls

The top 25 from the AP and USA Today Coaches Polls.

Associated Press
Ranking Team
1 Oregon (25)
2 Baylor (3)
3 Stanford
4 Maryland
5 UConn
6 Texas A&M
7 Oregon State
8 South Carolina
9 Louisville
10 Mississippi State
11 UCLA
12 Florida State
13 Kentucky
14 NC State
15 Texas
16 Notre Dame
17 Michigan State
18 DePaul
Miami (FL)
20 Arizona State
21 Syracuse
22 Arkansas
23 Minnesota
24 Indiana
25 Michigan
USA Today Coaches
Ranking Team
1 Oregon (24)
2 Baylor (8)
3 Stanford
4 UConn
5 Maryland
6 Oregon State
7 Texas A&M
8 Mississippi State
9 Louisville
10 South Carolina
11 UCLA
12 NC State
13 Florida State
14 Notre Dame
15 Texas
16 Kentucky
17 Syracuse
18 Arizona State
19 Miami (FL)
20 DePaul
21 Michigan State
22 Arkansas
23 Gonzaga
24 Michigan
Iowa State

Regular season

Early season tournaments

Name Dates Location No. teams Champion
Preseason WNIT November 8–17 Campus Sites 16 Oregon State
Cancún Challenge November 28–30 Moon Palace Golf & Spa Resort
(Cancún, MX)
10 Florida Gulf Coast
Junkanoo Jam November 28–30 Gateway Christian Academy
(Bimini, Bahamas)
10 LSU
Greater Victoria Invitational November 28–30 University of Victoria
(Saanich, British Columbia)
8 Stanford
Paradise Jam Tournament November 28–30 Sports and Fitness Center
(Saint Thomas, VI)
8 Louisville (Island Division)
Indiana/South Carolina (Reef Division)
Daytona Beach Invitational November 29–30 Ocean Center
(Daytona Beach, FL)
10 Georgia
Maryland
Gulf Coast Showcase November 29–December 1 Hertz Arena
(Estero, FL)
8 Gonzaga
West Palm Beach Invitational December 19–21 Student Life Center
(West Palm Beach, FL)
10 Wake Forest
Duel in the Desert December 19–21 Cox Pavilion
(Las Vegas, NV)
4 Mississippi State

Upsets

An upset is a victory by an underdog team. In the context of NCAA Division I Women's Basketball, this generally constitutes an unranked team defeating a team currently ranked in the Top 25. This list will highlight those upsets of ranked teams by unranked teams as well as upsets of #1 teams. Rankings are from the AP poll. Bold type indicates winning teams in "true road games"—i.e., those played on an opponent's home court (including secondary homes).

Winner Score Loser Date Tournament/Event
Missouri State 77–69 #23 Minnesota November 5, 2019
South Florida 64–57 #15 Texas November 8, 2019
Tennessee 74–63 #15 Notre Dame November 11, 2019
Minnesota 80–66 #19 Arizona State November 17, 2019
Arizona 83–58 #22 Texas November 17, 2019
Notre Dame 76–72 #21 Michigan November 23, 2019
California 84–80 #20 Arkansas November 24, 2019
South Dakota State 61–50 #21 South Florida November 28, 2019 Cancún Challenge
Creighton 82–75 #23 West Virginia November 28, 2019 Cancún Challenge
Florida Gulf Coast 81–77 #21 South Florida November 29, 2019 Cancún Challenge
LSU 58–56 #15 Michigan State November 29, 2019 Junkanoo Jam
Notre Dame 67–51 #21 South Florida November 30, 2019 Cancún Challenge
#8 Louisville 72–62 #1 Oregon November 30, 2019 Paradise Jam
Green Bay 79–73OT #18 Syracuse November 30, 2019 Greater Victoria Invitational
Ohio State 67–60 #2 Louisville December 5, 2019 ACC–Big Ten Women's Challenge
Oklahoma 90–68 #25 LSU December 7, 2019 Big 12/SEC Women's Challenge
West Virginia 71–65 #10 Mississippi State December 8, 2019 Big 12/SEC Women's Challenge
Texas 66–60 #17 Tennessee December 8, 2019 Big 12/SEC Women's Challenge
Syracuse 77–63 #19 Michigan State December 20, 2019 Florida Sunshine Classic
Texas 69–64 #1 Stanford December 22, 2019
Ohio State 66–63 #24 Minnesota December 31, 2019
Northwestern 81–58 #12 Maryland December 31, 2019
Syracuse 90–89OT #8 Florida State January 2, 2020
Georgia Tech 61–54 #23 Miami January 2, 2020
TCU 65–63 #25 Texas January 3, 2020
Nebraska 72–58 #24 Minnesota January 4, 2020
#6 Baylor 74–58 #1 UConn January 9, 2020
Ohio State 78–69 #24 Michigan January 9, 2020
North Carolina 66–60 #9 NC State January 9, 2020 Rivalry
Georgia Tech 67–52 #11 Florida State January 9, 2020
Iowa 66–61 #17 Maryland January 9, 2020
LSU 57–54 #10 Texas A&M January 9, 2020
Arizona State 72–66 #2 Oregon January 10, 2020
Arizona State 55–47 #3 Oregon State January 12, 2020
Iowa 91–852OT #12 Indiana January 12, 2020
Oklahoma 73–49 #17 West Virginia January 15, 2019
Northwestern 71–69OT #15 Indiana January 16, 2020
Southern Illinois 70–68 #19 Missouri State January 17, 2020
USC 70–682OT #7 UCLA January 17, 2020 Rivalry
LSU 65–59 #11 Kentucky January 19, 2020
Oklahoma State 57–55 #25 West Virginia January 22, 2020
Georgia 64–55 #21 Arkansas January 23, 2020
TCU 73–60 #25 West Virginia January 26, 2020
Boston College 65–56 #14 Florida State January 30, 2020
Creighton 63–61 #11 DePaul January 31, 2020
Michigan 78–63 #18 Iowa February 2, 2020
Florida 70–62 #13 Kentucky February 2, 2020
LSU 59–58 #15 Texas A&M February 2, 2020
Saint Mary's 70–60 #11 Gonzaga February 8, 2020
Syracuse 59–51 #5 Louisville February 9, 2020
LSU 75–65 #25 Tennessee February 13, 2020
USC 72–66 #11 Oregon State February 14, 2020
Duke 66–64 #14 Florida State February 16, 2020
Georgia Tech 65–61 #4 NC State February 16, 2020
Ohio State 80–76 #20 Indiana February 16, 2020
Villanova 76–58 #12 DePaul February 23, 2020
Alabama 66–64 #9 Mississippi State February 23, 2020
Colorado 50–38 #11 Arizona February 23, 2020
Washington 74–68 #8 UCLA February 23, 2020
Utah 75–71 #21 Arizona State February 23, 2020
Florida 83–80 #22 Arkansas February 23, 2020
Georgia Tech 65–62 #17 Florida State February 23, 2020
Duke 70–65 #8 NC State February 24, 2020 Play4Kay
Texas 77–67 #25 TCU February 26, 2020
Alabama 76–63 #12 Texas A&M February 27, 2020
Illinois State 78–66 #21 Missouri State February 27, 2020
Rutgers 78–74OT #18 Iowa March 1, 2020
Texas Tech 87–83 #25 TCU March 1, 2020
Marquette 90–83 #16 DePaul March 1, 2020
Vanderbilt 70–64 #15 Kentucky March 1, 2020
California 55–54 #13 Arizona March 1, 2020
Notre Dame 70–67 #19 Florida State March 1, 2020
California 71–67 #24 Arizona State March 5, 2020 Pac-12 Tournament
Michigan 67–59 #11 Northwestern March 7, 2020 Big Ten Tournament
Ohio State 87–66 #19 Iowa March 7, 2020 Big Ten Tournament
Iowa State 57–56 #2 Baylor March 8, 2020
Portland 70–69 #11 Gonzaga March 9, 2020 WCC Tournament


Conference winners and tournaments

Each of the 32 Division I athletic conferences ends its regular season with a single-elimination tournament. The team with the best regular-season record in each conference is given the number one seed in each tournament, with tiebreakers used as needed in the case of ties for the top seeding. The winners of these tournaments receive automatic invitations to the 2020 NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Tournament.

Conference Regular
season first place
Conference
Player of the Year
Conference
Coach of the Year
Conference
tournament
Tournament
venue (city)
Tournament
winner
America East Conference Stony Brook Kai Moon, Binghamton[44] Caroline McCombs, Stony Brook[44] 2020 America East Women's Basketball Tournament Campus sites Tournament canceled in progress due to coronavirus pandemic
American Athletic Conference UConn Megan Walker, UConn[45] Geno Auriemma, UConn[45] 2020 American Athletic Conference Women's Basketball Tournament Mohegan Sun Arena
(Uncasville, CT)
UConn
Atlantic 10 Conference Dayton Bre Cavanaugh, Fordham[46] Shauna Green, Dayton[46] 2020 Atlantic 10 Women's Basketball Tournament First round: Campus sites
Remainder: UD Arena
(Dayton, OH)
Dayton
Atlantic Coast Conference Louisville Dana Evans, Louisville[47] Joanna Bernabei-McNamee, Boston College[47] 2020 ACC Women's Basketball Tournament Greensboro Coliseum
(Greensboro, NC)
NC State
Atlantic Sun Conference Florida Gulf Coast Keri Jewett-Giles, Florida Gulf Coast[48] Karl Smesko, Florida Gulf Coast[48] 2020 Atlantic Sun Women's Basketball Tournament Campus sites Tournament canceled in progress due to coronavirus pandemic
Big 12 Conference Baylor Lauren Cox, Baylor[49] Kim Mulkey, Baylor[49] 2020 Big 12 Conference Women's Basketball Tournament Municipal Auditorium
(Kansas City, MO)
Tournament canceled due to coronavirus pandemic
Big East Conference DePaul Jaylyn Agnew, Creighton[50] Megan Duffy, Marquette[50] 2020 Big East Women's Basketball Tournament Wintrust Arena
(Chicago, IL)
DePaul
Big Sky Conference Montana State Fallyn Freije, Montana State[51] Tricia Binford, Montana State[52] 2020 Big Sky Conference Women's Basketball Tournament CenturyLink Arena
(Boise, ID)
Tournament canceled due to coronavirus pandemic
Big South Conference Campbell Camryn Brown, High Point[53] Ronny Fisher, Campbell[53] 2020 Big South Conference Women's Basketball Tournament First round: Campus sites
Quarterfinals/semifinals: #1 seed
Final: Top surviving seed
Tournament canceled in progress due to coronavirus pandemic
Big Ten Conference Maryland[a] and Northwestern Kathleen Doyle, Iowa[54] Joe McKeown, Northwestern[54] 2020 Big Ten Conference Women's Basketball Tournament Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(Indianapolis, IN)
Maryland
Big West Conference UC Davis Raina Perez, Cal State Fullerton[55] Jennifer Gross, UC Davis[55] 2020 Big West Conference Women's Basketball Tournament First round and quarterfinals: Walter Pyramid
(Long Beach, CA)
Semifinals and final: Honda Center
(Anaheim, CA)
Tournament canceled in progress due to coronavirus pandemic
Colonial Athletic Association Drexel[a] and James Madison Kamiah Smalls, James Madison[56] Denise Dillon, Drexel &
Ed Swanson, William & Mary[56]
2020 CAA Women's Basketball Tournament Schar Center
(Elon, NC)
Tournament canceled in progress due to coronavirus pandemic
Conference USA Rice Erica Ogwumike, Rice[57] Nikki McCray, Old Dominion[57] 2020 Conference USA Women's Basketball Tournament Ford Center
(Frisco, TX)
Tournament canceled in progress due to coronavirus pandemic
Horizon League IUPUI Macee Williams, IUPUI[58] Austin Parkinson, IUPUI[58] 2020 Horizon League Women's Basketball Tournament Quarterfinals: Campus sites
Semifinals and final: Indiana Farmers Coliseum
(Indianapolis, IN)
IUPUI
Ivy League Princeton Bella Alarie, Princeton[59] Carla Berube, Princeton[59] 2020 Ivy League Women's Basketball Tournament Lavietes Pavilion
(Boston, MA)
Tournament canceled due to coronavirus pandemic[60]
Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Marist and Rider[a] Stella Johnson, Rider[61] Lynn Milligan, Rider[62] 2020 MAAC Women's Basketball Tournament Boardwalk Hall
(Atlantic City, NJ)
Tournament canceled in progress due to coronavirus pandemic
Mid-American Conference Kent State (East)
Central Michigan (West)
Micaela Kelly, Central Michigan[63] Heather Oesterle, Central Michigan[63] 2020 Mid-American Conference Women's Basketball Tournament First round: Campus sites
Remainder: Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse
(Cleveland, OH)
Tournament canceled in progress due to coronavirus pandemic
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Bethune–Cookman Chanette Hicks, Norfolk State[64] Ed Davis, Morgan State[64] 2020 MEAC Women's Basketball Tournament Norfolk Scope
(Norfolk, VA)
Tournament canceled in progress due to coronavirus pandemic
Missouri Valley Conference Missouri State Becca Hittner, Drake[65] Amaka Agugua-Hamilton, Missouri State[65] 2020 Missouri Valley Conference Women's Basketball Tournament TaxSlayer Center
(Moline, IL)
Tournament canceled due to coronavirus pandemic
Mountain West Conference Fresno State Maddi Utti, Fresno State[66] Jaime White, Fresno State[66] 2020 Mountain West Conference Women's Basketball Tournament Thomas & Mack Center
(Paradise, NV)
Boise State
Northeast Conference Robert Morris Denia Davis-Stewart, Merrimack[67] Charlie Buscaglia, Robert Morris[67] 2020 Northeast Conference Women's Basketball Tournament Campus sites Tournament canceled in progress due to coronavirus pandemic
Ohio Valley Conference Belmont[a] and UT Martin Chelsey Perry, UT Martin[68] Rekha Patterson, Southeast Missouri State[68] 2020 Ohio Valley Conference Women's Basketball Tournament Ford Center
(Evansville, IN)
Southeast Missouri State
Pac-12 Conference Oregon Sabrina Ionescu, Oregon[69][70] Kelly Graves, Oregon[69][70] 2020 Pac-12 Conference Women's Basketball Tournament Mandalay Bay Events Center
(Paradise, NV)
Oregon
Patriot League Bucknell Ellie Mack, Bucknell[71] Trevor Woodruff, Bucknell[71] 2020 Patriot League Women's Basketball Tournament Campus sites Tournament canceled in progress due to coronavirus pandemic
Southeastern Conference South Carolina Rhyne Howard, Kentucky[72] Dawn Staley, South Carolina[72] 2020 SEC Women's Basketball Tournament Bon Secours Wellness Arena
(Greenville, SC)
South Carolina
Southern Conference Chattanooga, Samford[a] and UNC Greensboro Nadine Soliman, UNC Greensboro[73] Trina Patterson, UNC Greensboro (coaches & media)
Carley Kuhns, Samford (media)[73]
2020 Southern Conference Women's Basketball Tournament Harrah's Cherokee Center
(Asheville, NC)
Samford
Southland Conference Texas A&M–Corpus Christi Breanna Wright, Abilene Christian[74] Royce Chadwick, Texas A&M–Corpus Christi[74] 2020 Southland Conference Women's Basketball Tournament Leonard E. Merrell Center
(Katy, TX)
Tournament canceled due to coronavirus pandemic
Southwestern Athletic Conference Jackson State Ciane Cryor, Texas Southern[75] Tomekia Reed, Jackson State[75] 2020 SWAC Women's Basketball Tournament Quarterfinals: Campus sites
Semifinals and final: Bartow Arena
(Birmingham, AL)
Tournament canceled in progress due to coronavirus pandemic
Summit League South Dakota Ciara Duffy, South Dakota[76] Dawn Plitzuweit, South Dakota[76] 2020 Summit League Women's Basketball Tournament Denny Sanford Premier Center
(Sioux Falls, SD)
South Dakota
Sun Belt Conference Coastal Carolina DJ Williams, Coastal Carolina[77] Jaida Williams, Coastal Carolina[77] 2020 Sun Belt Conference Women's Basketball Tournament First three rounds: Campus sites
Semifinals and final: Smoothie King Center
(New Orleans, LA)
Tournament canceled in progress due to coronavirus pandemic
West Coast Conference Gonzaga Jill Townsend, Gonzaga[78] Cindy Fisher, San Diego[78] 2020 West Coast Conference Women's Basketball Tournament Orleans Arena
(Paradise, NV)
Portland
Western Athletic Conference Kansas City Ericka Mattingly, Kansas City[79] Jacie Hoyt, Kansas City[79] 2020 WAC Women's Basketball Tournament Tournament canceled due to coronavirus pandemic
  1. ^ a b c d e Top seed in conference tournament.

Statistical leaders

Points per game
Rebounds per game
Assists per game
Steals per game
Player School PPG Player School RPG Player School APG Player School SPG
Stella Johnson Rider 24.8 Ila Lane UC Santa Barbara 13.0 Sabrina Ionescu Oregon 9.1 Stephanie Karcz Loyola (MD) 5.17
Rhyne Howard Kentucky 23.4 Natalie Kucowski Lafayette 12.8 Jayde Christopher Boise State 8.2 Chanette Hicks Norfolk State 4.89
Chelsey Perry UT Martin 23.1 Natasha Mack Oklahoma State 12.5 Lauren Saiki UC Irvine 6.9 Lashonda Monk East Carolina 4.17
Dyaisha Fair Buffalo 22.0 Ellie Harmeyer Belmont 12.3 Tra'dayja Smith Longwood 6.5 Ciani Cryor Texas Southern 3.83
Micaela Kelly Central Michigan 21.5 Rodjanae Wade UNLV 11.8 Taja Cole Virginia Tech 6.5 Cierra Hooks Ohio 3.66
Blocked shots per game
Field goal percentage
Three-point field goal percentage
Free throw percentage
Player School BPG Player School FG% Player School 3FG% Player School FT%
Sara Hamson BYU 4.72 Ruthy Hebard Oregon .685 Madisen Parker Bowling Green .480 Jaylyn Agnew Creighton .950
Brittany Brewer Texas Tech 4.38 Monika Czinano Iowa .679 Abi Scheid Northwestern .477 Ayzhiana Basallo San Jose State .925
Natasha Mack Oklahoma State 3.56 Dariauna Lewis Alabama A&M .652 Chloe Wanink Wofford .474 Eva Hodgson William & Mary .912
Kate Cain Nebraska 3.37 Sara Rhine Drake .650 Brynna Maxwell Utah .472 Brandi Bisping Milwaukee .908
Nancy Mulkey Rice 3.21 Anisha George North Texas .646 Kelly Campbell DePaul .460 Alexa Willard Missouri State .906

Postseason

NCAA Tournament

Conference standings

2019–20 America East Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Stony Brook 14 2   .875     26 3   .897
Maine 12 4   .750     16 14   .533
UMass Lowell 11 5   .688     15 14   .517
Binghamton 10 6   .625     21 8   .724
New Hampshire 7 9   .438     10 18   .357
Vermont 6 10   .375     12 17   .414
UMBC 6 10   .375     10 17   .370
Albany 5 11   .313     9 20   .310
Hartford 1 15   .063     1 28   .034
2020 America East Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 American Athletic Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
No. 5 UConn 16 0   1.000     26 3   .897
Cincinnati 11 5   .688     20 9   .690
UCF 11 5   .688     19 9   .679
South Florida 10 6   .625     18 12   .600
Tulane 8 8   .500     13 16   .448
Temple 7 9   .438     15 14   .517
Wichita State 7 9   .438     15 14   .517
SMU 7 9   .438     13 15   .464
East Carolina 6 10   .375     9 20   .310
Houston 5 11   .313     12 18   .400
Memphis 4 12   .250     13 16   .448
Tulsa 4 12   .250     9 20   .310
2020 AAC Tournament winner
As of March 4, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Atlantic 10 women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Dayton 15 1   .938     25 8   .758
VCU 13 3   .813     20 12   .625
Fordham 11 5   .688     21 10   .677
Duquesne 9 7   .563     20 11   .645
Massachusetts 9 7   .563     20 11   .645
Saint Louis 9 7   .563     19 13   .594
Davidson 8 8   .500     16 15   .516
George Washington 8 8   .500     14 16   .467
Richmond 7 9   .438     15 17   .469
La Salle 7 9   .438     13 17   .433
Rhode Island 6 10   .375     13 16   .448
St. Bonaventure 4 12   .250     7 23   .233
Saint Joseph's 3 13   .188     9 20   .310
George Mason 3 13   .188     9 21   .300
2020 A10 Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 ACC women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
No. 6 Louisville 16 2   .889     28 4   .875
No. 8 NC State† 14 4   .778     28 4   .875
Duke 12 6   .667     18 12   .600
No. 18 Florida State 11 7   .611     24 8   .750
Virginia Tech 11 7   .611     21 9   .700
Boston College 11 7   .611     20 12   .625
Georgia Tech 10 8   .556     20 11   .645
Syracuse 9 9   .500     16 15   .516
Virginia 8 10   .444     13 17   .433
Notre Dame 8 10   .444     13 18   .419
Miami (FL) 7 11   .389     15 15   .500
North Carolina 7 11   .389     16 14   .533
Wake Forest 7 11   .389     16 16   .500
Clemson 3 15   .167     8 23   .258
Pittsburgh 1 17   .056     5 26   .161
2020 ACC Tournament winner
As of March 5, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Atlantic Sun women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Florida Gulf Coast 15 1   .938     28 3   .903
North Alabama* 11 5   .688     20 8   .714
Liberty 11 5   .688     18 11   .621
Jacksonville 10 6   .625     18 11   .621
North Florida 8 8   .500     15 14   .517
Kennesaw State 6 10   .375     13 15   .464
Stetson 6 10   .375     12 17   .414
Lipscomb 4 12   .250     7 22   .241
NJIT 1 15   .063     4 25   .138
* ineligible for the 2020 NCAA Tournament due to transition period
2020 ASUN Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Big East Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
No. 15 DePaul 15 3   .833     28 5   .848
Marquette 13 5   .722     24 8   .750
Butler 11 7   .611     19 11   .633
Creighton 11 7   .611     19 11   .633
Seton Hall 11 7   .611     19 12   .613
St. John's 11 7   .611     19 12   .613
Villanova 11 7   .611     18 13   .581
Providence 3 15   .167     13 19   .406
Georgetown 2 16   .111     5 25   .167
Xavier 2 16   .111     3 27   .100
2020 Big East Tournament winner
As of April 1, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Big Sky women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Montana State 17 1   .944     21 6   .778
Idaho 13 5   .722     18 9   .667
Idaho State 12 6   .667     16 11   .593
Northern Arizona 12 7   .632     15 13   .536
Montana 11 7   .611     16 11   .593
Southern Utah 10 8   .556     16 11   .593
Northern Colorado 8 10   .444     12 15   .444
Portland State 7 11   .389     13 15   .464
Sacramento State 6 13   .316     8 20   .286
Eastern Washington 3 15   .167     4 23   .148
Weber State 1 17   .056     3 24   .111
2020 Big Sky Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Big South women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Campbell 16 4   .800     21 8   .724
Radford 15 5   .750     17 12   .586
Hampton 14 6   .700     18 11   .621
High Point 14 6   .700     16 13   .552
Gardner-Webb 13 7   .650     18 11   .621
UNC Asheville 9 11   .450     15 14   .517
Longwood 8 12   .400     12 17   .414
Winthrop 8 12   .400     11 18   .379
Presbyterian 7 13   .350     11 18   .379
USC Upstate 4 16   .200     9 20   .310
Charleston Southern 2 18   .100     4 25   .138
2020 Big South Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Big Ten women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
No. 4 Maryland† 16 2   .889     28 4   .875
No. 12 Northwestern 16 2   .889     26 4   .867
No. 21 Iowa 14 4   .778     23 7   .767
No. 20 Indiana 13 5   .722     24 8   .750
Rutgers 11 7   .611     22 9   .710
Ohio State 11 7   .611     21 12   .636
Michigan 10 8   .556     21 11   .656
Michigan State 9 9   .500     16 14   .533
Purdue 8 10   .444     18 14   .563
Nebraska 7 11   .389     17 13   .567
Minnesota 5 13   .278     16 15   .516
Wisconsin 3 15   .167     12 19   .387
Illinois 2 16   .111     11 19   .367
Penn State 1 17   .056     7 23   .233
2020 Big Ten Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Big 12 Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
No. 3 Baylor 17 1   .944     28 2   .933
TCU 13 5   .722     22 7   .759
Texas 11 7   .611     19 11   .633
Iowa State 10 8   .556     18 11   .621
Kansas State 10 8   .556     16 13   .552
Texas Tech 7 11   .389     18 11   .621
West Virginia 7 11   .389     17 12   .586
Oklahoma State 6 12   .333     15 15   .500
Oklahoma 5 13   .278     12 18   .400
Kansas 4 14   .222     15 14   .517
2020 Big 12 Conference Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Big West women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
UC Davis 11 3   .786     16 11   .593
Cal State Fullerton 8 6   .571     16 11   .593
Hawaii 8 6   .571     14 13   .519
UC Santa Barbara 8 7   .533     13 15   .464
UC Irvine 7 7   .500     11 17   .393
Long Beach State 6 8   .429     11 16   .407
Cal State Northridge 6 8   .429     11 17   .393
Cal Poly 6 9   .400     9 17   .346
UC Riverside 4 10   .286     8 20   .286
2020 Big West Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 CAA women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
James Madison 16 2   .889     25 4   .862
Drexel 16 2   .889     23 7   .767
William & Mary 12 6   .667     21 8   .724
Towson 9 9   .500     14 15   .483
Northeastern 9 9   .500     13 16   .448
Elon 8 10   .444     13 16   .448
Delaware 8 10   .444     12 17   .414
Charleston 6 12   .333     13 16   .448
UNC Wilmington 6 12   .333     9 20   .310
Hofstra 0 18   .000     3 26   .103
2020 CAA Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Conference USA women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Rice 16 2   .889     21 8   .724
Old Dominion 14 4   .778     24 6   .800
Western Kentucky 14 4   .778     22 7   .759
Middle Tennessee 13 5   .722     21 9   .700
UAB 12 6   .667     20 10   .667
Charlotte 11 7   .611     20 9   .690
UTEP 8 10   .444     15 14   .517
Southern Miss 7 11   .389     15 14   .517
Florida Atlantic 7 11   .389     13 16   .448
Marshall 7 11   .389     12 17   .414
Louisiana Tech 6 12   .333     14 15   .483
North Texas 6 12   .333     12 18   .400
FIU 3 15   .167     6 23   .207
UTSA 2 16   .111     6 23   .207
2020 C-USA Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Horizon League women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
IUPUI 15 3   .833     23 8   .742
Wright State 13 5   .722     19 12   .613
Green Bay 13 5   .722     19 13   .594
Northern Kentucky 12 6   .667     20 12   .625
Milwaukee 11 7   .611     15 16   .484
Cleveland State 9 9   .500     21 11   .656
Youngstown State 6 12   .333     13 17   .433
Oakland 6 12   .333     11 19   .367
Detroit Mercy 3 15   .167     3 27   .100
UIC 2 16   .111     3 27   .100
2020 Horizon League Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Ivy League women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
No. 22 Princeton 14 0   1.000     26 1   .963
Penn 10 4   .714     20 7   .741
Yale 9 5   .643     18 8   .692
Columbia 8 6   .571     17 10   .630
Harvard 6 8   .429     15 12   .556
Dartmouth 4 10   .286     10 17   .370
Cornell 3 11   .214     10 16   .385
Brown 2 12   .143     8 19   .296
2020 Ivy League Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020

Ivy League Tournament canceled due to 2020 coronavirus pandemic; Rankings from AP Poll

2019–20 MAAC women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Marist 18 2   .900     25 4   .862
Rider 18 2   .900     25 4   .862
Fairfield 12 8   .600     15 14   .517
Manhattan 12 8   .600     15 14   .517
Quinnipiac 12 8   .600     15 14   .517
Siena 8 12   .400     10 19   .345
Iona 8 12   .400     9 20   .310
Niagara 7 13   .350     9 20   .310
Saint Peter's 6 14   .300     9 20   .310
Monmouth 5 15   .250     8 21   .276
Canisius 4 16   .200     5 24   .172
2020 MAAC Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Mid-American Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
East
Kent State 10 6   .625     17 10   .630
Ohio 10 6   .625     17 10   .630
Buffalo 7 9   .438     16 11   .593
Akron 7 9   .438     14 13   .519
Miami (OH) 4 12   .250     11 17   .393
Bowling Green 2 14   .125     9 19   .321
West
Central Michigan 15 1   .938     22 5   .815
Ball State 12 4   .750     20 8   .714
Western Michigan 9 7   .563     16 11   .593
Eastern Michigan 9 7   .563     14 13   .519
Toledo 6 10   .375     11 16   .407
Northern Illinois 5 11   .313     9 18   .333
2020 MAC Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 MEAC women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Bethune–Cookman 15 1   .938     22 5   .815
Norfolk State 12 4   .750     18 11   .621
Morgan State 12 4   .750     16 13   .552
North Carolina A&T 11 5   .688     19 9   .679
North Carolina Central 9 7   .563     12 17   .414
Delaware State 8 8   .500     12 17   .414
Howard 7 9   .438     16 14   .533
Maryland–Eastern Shore 5 11   .313     9 21   .300
Florida A&M 4 12   .250     6 21   .222
Coppin State 3 13   .188     3 25   .107
South Carolina State 2 14   .125     3 27   .100
2020 MEAC Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Missouri Valley Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
No. 23 Missouri State 15 2   .882     25 4   .862
Drake 14 3   .824     22 7   .759
Bradley 11 5   .688     20 7   .741
Illinois State 10 7   .588     18 10   .643
Northern Iowa 9 8   .529     17 11   .607
Southern Illinois 8 9   .471     16 12   .571
Valparaiso 8 9   .471     16 12   .571
Loyola 6 11   .353     15 13   .536
Indiana State 3 14   .176     5 24   .172
Evansville 0 17   .000     3 25   .107
2020 MVC Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Mountain West Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Fresno State 16 2   .889     24 6   .800
Boise State 13 5   .722     22 9   .710
Wyoming 12 6   .667     16 11   .593
San Jose State 12 6   .667     19 11   .633
San Diego State 9 9   .500     14 17   .452
UNLV 9 9   .500     13 17   .433
Nevada 7 11   .389     15 16   .484
Air Force 7 11   .389     10 21   .323
New Mexico 6 12   .333     15 17   .469
Colorado State 6 12   .333     12 18   .400
Utah State 2 16   .111     8 22   .267
2020 MW Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Northeast Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Robert Morris 17 1   .944     22 7   .759
Mount St. Mary's 14 4   .778     19 11   .633
Merrimack* 13 5   .722     20 9   .690
Fairleigh Dickinson 9 9   .500     12 17   .414
Sacred Heart 9 9   .500     12 17   .414
Saint Francis (PA) 9 9   .500     11 18   .379
Wagner 7 11   .389     11 18   .379
Bryant 7 11   .389     9 20   .310
LIU 7 11   .389     8 21   .276
St. Francis Brooklyn 4 14   .222     8 21   .276
Central Connecticut 3 15   .167     4 25   .138
*Ineligible for NEC championship (reclassification from Division II)
2020 NEC Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll


2019–20 Ohio Valley Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Belmont 16 2   .889     21 8   .724
UT Martin 16 2   .889     20 9   .690
Southeast Missouri State 14 4   .778     22 7   .759
Eastern Illinois 12 6   .667     18 11   .621
Tennessee Tech 10 8   .556     17 12   .586
Jacksonville State 10 8   .556     14 15   .483
Austin Peay 9 9   .500     18 11   .621
Murray State 7 11   .389     14 15   .483
Morehead State 6 12   .333     10 20   .333
Eastern Kentucky 5 13   .278     11 18   .379
Tennessee State 2 16   .111     4 24   .143
SIU Edwardsville 1 17   .056     3 26   .103
2020 OVC Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Pac-12 Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
No. 2 Oregon† 17 1   .944     31 2   .939
No. 10 UCLA 14 4   .778     26 5   .839
No. 7 Stanford 14 4   .778     27 6   .818
No. 13 Arizona 12 6   .667     24 7   .774
No. 14 Oregon State 10 8   .556     23 9   .719
No. 25 Arizona State 10 8   .556     20 11   .645
USC 8 10   .444     17 14   .548
Utah 6 12   .333     14 17   .452
Colorado 5 13   .278     16 14   .533
Washington 5 13   .278     13 17   .433
Washington State 4 14   .222     11 20   .355
California 3 15   .167     12 19   .387
2020 Pac-12 Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Patriot League women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Bucknell 15 2   .882     22 6   .786
Colgate 11 6   .647     19 9   .679
Boston University 11 6   .647     16 12   .571
Lafayette 11 6   .647     15 12   .556
Holy Cross 10 7   .588     17 11   .607
Lehigh 8 8   .500     16 11   .593
American 7 10   .412     11 16   .407
Loyola (MD) 5 11   .313     8 19   .296
Army 4 13   .235     8 20   .286
Navy 2 15   .118     7 21   .250
2020 Patriot League Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 SEC women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
No. 1 South Carolina 16 0   1.000     32 1   .970
No. 9 Mississippi State 13 3   .813     27 6   .818
No. 24 Arkansas 10 6   .625     24 8   .750
No. 16 Kentucky 10 6   .625     22 8   .733
No. 19 Texas A&M 10 6   .625     22 8   .733
Tennessee 10 6   .625     21 10   .677
LSU 9 7   .563     20 10   .667
Alabama 8 8   .500     18 12   .600
Georgia 7 9   .438     17 14   .548
Florida 6 10   .375     15 15   .500
Missouri 5 11   .313     9 22   .290
Vanderbilt 4 12   .250     14 16   .467
Auburn 4 12   .250     11 18   .379
Ole Miss 0 16   .000     7 23   .233
2020 SEC Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Southern Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
UNC Greensboro 10 4   .714     21 8   .724
Samford† 10 4   .714     15 14   .517
Chattanooga 10 4   .714     11 17   .393
Furman 8 6   .571     12 11   .522
Wofford 8 6   .571     15 14   .517
East Tennessee State 4 10   .286     9 20   .310
Mercer 4 10   .286     7 22   .241
Western Carolina 2 12   .143     5 24   .172
2020 SoCon Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Southland Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Texas A&M-CC 17 3   .850     23 7   .767
Abilene Christian 16 4   .800     24 5   .828
Stephen F. Austin 16 4   .800     23 6   .793
Sam Houston State 14 6   .700     19 10   .655
New Orleans 13 7   .650     17 12   .586
Incarnate Word 10 10   .500     14 15   .483
Nicholls 10 10   .500     13 16   .448
Central Arkansas 9 11   .450     13 16   .448
Southeastern Louisiana 9 11   .450     12 17   .414
Lamar 6 14   .300     10 19   .345
Houston Baptist 4 16   .200     8 21   .276
Northwestern State 4 16   .200     7 22   .241
McNeese State 2 18   .100     5 24   .172
2020 Southland Tournament winner
As of March 7, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 SWAC women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Jackson State 15 1   .938     17 9   .654
Texas Southern 13 3   .813     18 9   .667
Southern 11 5   .688     13 14   .481
Alabama A&M 10 6   .625     14 13   .519
Prairie View A&M 9 7   .563     12 16   .429
Alcorn State 8 8   .500     12 16   .429
Alabama State 6 9   .400     9 17   .346
Arkansas-Pine Bluff 5 12   .294     6 21   .222
Grambling State 3 13   .188     4 23   .148
Mississippi Valley State 1 16   .059     2 26   .071
2020 SWAC Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Summit League women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
No. 17 South Dakota 16 0   1.000     28 2   .933
South Dakota State 13 3   .813     22 9   .710
Denver 9 7   .563     15 15   .500
Western Illinois 9 7   .563     15 15   .500
Oral Roberts 9 7   .563     15 15   .500
North Dakota State 7 9   .438     11 18   .379
North Dakota 6 10   .375     15 15   .500
Omaha 2 14   .125     7 23   .233
Purdue Fort Wayne 1 15   .063     5 24   .172
2020 Summit League Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 Sun Belt Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Troy* 16 2   .889     25 4   .862
Coastal Carolina 15 3   .833     25 4   .862
Texas–Arlington 14 4   .778     21 11   .656
Louisiana 10 8   .556     19 12   .613
South Alabama 9 9   .500     15 17   .469
Little Rock 9 9   .500     12 19   .387
Arkansas State 8 10   .444     12 18   .400
Appalachian State 8 10   .444     11 18   .379
Georgia Southern 7 11   .389     10 19   .345
Texas State 6 12   .333     13 17   .433
Georgia State 5 13   .278     8 21   .276
Louisiana–Monroe 1 17   .056     3 26   .103
2020 Sun Belt Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
2019–20 WAC women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
Kansas City 12 3   .800     19 10   .655
Grand Canyon 10 5   .667     15 11   .577
Utah Valley 9 6   .600     12 15   .444
UTRGV 8 7   .533     13 15   .464
New Mexico State 8 8   .500     11 18   .379
Cal State Bakersfield 7 8   .467     15 13   .536
Seattle 6 8   .429     12 15   .444
California Baptist* 6 9   .400     15 15   .500
Chicago State 1 13   .071     1 26   .037
2020 WAC Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll
*ineligible for the 2020 NCAA Tournament due to transition period
2019–20 West Coast Conference women's basketball standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   PCT     W   L   PCT
No. 11 Gonzaga 17 1   .944     28 3   .903
San Diego 13 5   .722     20 11   .645
BYU 13 5   .722     18 11   .621
Portland 11 7   .611     21 11   .656
Pacific 9 9   .500     17 14   .548
Pepperdine 8 10   .444     16 15   .516
Saint Mary's 6 12   .333     12 19   .387
San Francisco 5 13   .278     12 19   .387
Santa Clara 5 13   .278     12 19   .387
Loyola Marymount 3 15   .167     7 25   .219
2020 WCC Tournament winner
As of April 17, 2020; Rankings from AP Poll

Award winners

All-America teams

The NCAA has never recognized a consensus All-America team in women's basketball. This differs from the practice in men's basketball, in which the NCAA uses a combination of selections by the Associated Press (AP), the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC), the Sporting News, and the United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA) to determine a consensus All-America team. The selection of a consensus team is possible because all four organizations select at least a first and second team, with only the USBWA not selecting a third team.

Before the 2017–18 season, it was impossible for a consensus women's All-America team to be determined because the AP had been the only body that divided its women's selections into separate teams. The USBWA first named separate teams in 2017–18. The women's counterpart to the NABC, the Women's Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA), continues the USBWA's former practice of selecting a single 10-member (plus ties) team. The NCAA does not recognize Sporting News as an All-America selector in women's basketball.

Major player of the year awards

Major freshman of the year awards

Major coach of the year awards

Other major awards

Coaching changes

Several teams will change coaches during and after the season.

Team Former
coach
Interim
coach
New
coach
Reason
Alcorn State Courtney Pruitt Pruitt's contract was not renewed on March 23, ending her 5-year tenure at Alcorn State with a 49–102 overall record.[97]
Brown Sarah Behn Monique LeBlanc Behn announced her resignation from Brown on March 23 after 6 seasons and a 74–96 overall record.[98] On April 10, The Bears hired Merrimack head coach LeBlanc for the position.[99]
Coppin State Dewayne Burroughs Coppin State parted ways with Burroughs on March 31 after 4 seasons and a 22–95 overall record.[100]
Detroit Mercy Bernard Scott Scott was fired on March 19 after 5 seasons and a 42–109 overall record at UDM.[101]
Drexel Denise Dillon Amy Mallon Dillon left Drexel on March 27 after 17 seasons for the head coaching job at her alma mater Villanova. Not long after Dillon's departure, the Dragons promoted longtime assistant coach Mallon to the head coaching position.[102]
Grand Canyon Nicole Powell Molly Miller Powell left GCU on March 30 after three seasons for the head coaching job at UC Riverside.[103] On April 8, the Antelopes hired Miller from D-II Drury University as their new head coach.[104]
Merrimack Monique LeBlanc LeBlanc left Merrimack on April 10 after 9 seasons for the head coaching job at Brown.[99]
Mississippi State Vic Schaefer Nikki McCray-Penson On April 5, Texas hired Vic Schaefer away from Mississippi State following 8 seasons with the Bulldogs.[105]On April 9, Old Dominion head coach Nikki McCray-Penson was hired following 3 seasons as the Lady Monarchs' head coach.[106]
Navy Stefanie Pemper Pemper was fired on March 10 after 12 seasons at the Naval Academy, leaving as the program's winningest coach with 214 wins.[107]
North Dakota Travis Brewster Mallory Bernhard North Dakota's athletic director announced on March 11 that Brewster would not return as head coach after 9 seasons at UND, in which the Fighting Hawks went 128–120 overall.[108] Associate head coach Bernhard will serve as the interim head coach for the 2020–21 season.[109]
Northwestern State Jordan Dupuy Aaron Swinson Anna Nimz Dupuy announced his resignation from Northwestern State on January 26 after 3½ seasons. During his tenure, the Lady Demons went 36–60, including a 5–13 overall record and 2–7 record in conference play at the time of his resignation. Assistant coach Swinson served as the team's interim head coach for the rest of the season.[110] On March 18, the school initially hired Missy Bilderback from Jones College of the NJCAA as their new head coach,[111] but on April 6, Bilderback backed out and returned to Jones College.[112] The school would then hire UT Rio Grand Valley associate head coach Nimz on April 11.[113]
Old Dominion Nikki McCray-Penson On April 9, Mississippi State hired Nikki McCray-Penson following 3 seasons as the Lady Monarchs' head coach.[106]
Omaha Brittany Lange Carrie Banks Lange's contract with Omaha was not renewed on March 9, ending her 7-year tenure at the school with a 80–124 overall record.[114] Ohio State assistant coach Banks was named the new head coach of the Mavericks on April 8.[115]
Texas Karen Aston Vic Schaefer Aston was dismissed on April 3 despite a 184–83 overall record in eight seasons, including four straight Sweet Sixteen appearances from 2015–18; however, the Longhorns went 1–18 against Baylor during her tenure.[116]On April 5, Texas hired Vic Schaefer away from Mississippi State following 8 seasons with the Bulldogs.[117]
UC Riverside John Margaritis Seyram Bell Nicole Powell Margartis announced his resignation on September 13 after 15 seasons at UC Riverside, a day after being placed on unpaid leave when the school launched an investigation into accusations of emotional and verbal abuse by current and former UC Riverside players against him. Assistant coach Bell was named interim head coach of the Highlanders for the 2019–20 season.[118] On March 30, the school hired Grand Canyon head coach Nicole Powell.[103]
UNC Asheville Brenda Mock Kirkpatrick Honey Brown Mock Kirkpatrick announced her resignation from UNC Asheville on April 7 after 8 seasons and a 117–137 overall record. Almost immediately after Mock Kirkpatrick's resignation, the Bulldogs promoted associate head coach Brown to fill the vacancy.[119]
UNLV Kathy Olivier Lindy La Racque Olivier announced her resignation on March 6 after 12 seasons at her alma mater, finishing with a 182–193 overall record with only one postseason tournament appearance.[120] On March 18, Stanford assistant coach and Las Vegas native La Racque was named the new head coach of the Lady Rebels.[121]
Utah State Jerry Finkbeiner Ben Finkbeiner Kayla Ard Finkbeiner, who had been on a medical leave of absence since early November, announced on November 25 that he was stepping down from his head coaching position after 7 seasons at Utah State. His son Ben, the Aggies associate head coach, was named interim head coach for the rest of the season.[122] Denver assistant coach and recruiting coordinator Ard was named Utah State's new head coach on March 23.[123]
Villanova Harry Perretta Denise Dillon The then 64-year-old Perretta announced on October 30 that he would retire at the end of the 2019–20 season. His 42 seasons as the Wildcats' head coach tie him with Yvonne Kaufmann, who coached at Division III Elizabethtown from 1971 to 2012, for the most at a single school in NCAA history (including seasons in which women's sports were governed by the AIAW).[124] On March 27, the Wildcats hired Villanova alum Denise Dillon from nearby Drexel as their new head coach.[102]
Winthrop Lynette Woodard Woodard was relieved of her head coaching duties on March 24 after 3 seasons at Winthrop, in which the Eagles went 24–70 overall.[125]

See also

Footnotes

References

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